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  1. Yesterday
  2. Rather than start such a thread from the beginning, have a look at this from way-back-when! https://bit.ly/2PGaVz7
  3. Last week
  4. Moonsmith

    Visionary Leaders

    Others share your opinion.Ellinas. .... of a good leader, when his work is done, when his aims are fulfilled, men will say, " we did it ourselves." Lao Tzu Tao Te Jing (Gender issues of somewhere about sixth century BCE) I can go along with that as long as the leader leads by example and carries any and all cans. This also means that a charismatic/visionary orator takes responsibility for the actions of the mob who interpret or misinterpret their words.
  5. Ellinas

    Visionary Leaders

    The best leaders, seems to me, are hardly noticeable. Ab tergo ducimus, I believe, translates as "we lead from behind".
  6. Usk

    Visionary Leaders

    Thank's for this ED. I particularly appreciate.. Letter to the president There is always hope. Cautious optimism is better than none at all. Once again my thanks. 🙏
  7. Moonsmith

    Visionary Leaders

    We applaud visionaries whose visions accord with our own.
  8. Moonsmith

    Visionary Leaders

    Long ago, training as a Management Development specialist I was taught that the best leadership is situational. Someone who does the leadership job, inspires the next leaders and buggers off. We were shown three categories:- Structural Leadership. A leadership position as an established slot within some form of social structure. A CEO, an HP or a Modron would fit but are very likely to have other one or both of the other leadership characteristics. All are happily developing their own replacements. Sapiential Leadership. Someone who takes the lead, regardless of rank because they are experienced in the particular situation in which the organisation finds itself. A war leader, someone who comes to the fore in a crisis. They may or may not adapt once the crisis is over. Churchill didn't. Eisenhower did better, De Gaul better still. A Charismatic leader may not have any expertise in the situation they are leading but they are able to inspire, communicate with (or at worst, manipulate) those whom they are able to impress. Whatever you may think of the fortyfifth president of the US or the Bullingdon Bottler in No10, they have elements of this form of leadership. I may not like it but then I am not of their constituency. John Harvey Jones described a good leader:- Someone who knows where they are going, can take their people with them and is happy to hand over when necessary whether temporarily or permanently. I do not trust flash and fireworks leaders. It wasn't Henry V who went unto the breach, it was the usual cannon fodder. I'd look for s leader who rolled up their sleeves and found a better way through the walls of Harfleur or an inovative way over them. They wouldn't have been personally remarked and neither would their chief engineer but they'd have been my kind of leader.
  9. Stonehugger

    Visionary Leaders

    Both of them, especially Attenborough, being evidence that leaders don't have to have the manner of a sergeant-major stereotype.
  10. Roots

    Visionary Leaders

    Very much agree with the unique role Greta has taken on leading awareness on the climate emergency. I've never really had much time for mainstream politics but have always admired Caroline Lucas for years. She conducts herself impeccably in the face of much antagonism or ridicule from other MP's. Perhaps obvious choices given my love and compassion for animals are David Attenborough and Chris Packham for their tireless work and unswerving passion.
  11. Earthdragon

    Visionary Leaders

    Good point. Setting people up as hero's and role models will have an inevitable danger in the possibility that our views of them can be toppled. Better to have visionary leaders who create a movement for change which is identified separately from their own persona. A grassroots type movement empowers individuals rather than sets them up as beholden to the reputation of a leader. I'll go for Shiva Ayyadurai as a visionary leader. https://shiva4senate.com/ It's actuslly a bit of a shock to me that I have latched onto a political campaign as I gave up on the world of politics quite some time ago - but he does stand for the type of change I think the world needs. A systems biologist with four degrees from MIT, a migrant from Southern India who has researched traditional Indian systems of medicine from a Western systems approach. In his words "providing real solutions to real problems".
  12. Stonehugger

    Visionary Leaders

    I wonder how many people would have mentioned Richard Branson before his Covid-19 government subsidy difficulties severely undermined his reputation. Do we still say "oh look, there's a visionary leader" when we know they're extremely flawed characters? A bit like asking whether Wagner can be admired for being a great composer despite his politics. Also a bit like admiring what big international charities do until they get caught in a sexual abuse or executive pay scandal. Likewise colonialists who struggle to keep their statues in place and vertical as social attitudes change. I'll cop out. A friend goes on and on about Tara Hamilton Howard, who's CV sounds like Helen Skelton on speed, so she's my nomination. Same friend is also a big Yanis Varoufakis fan.
  13. Stonehugger

    Book recommendations please?

    This is published by DK so probably anonymous, but Suzannah Lipscomb has written the foreword, which should lessen the chance of it being complete twaddle.
  14. hedgerose

    Visionary Leaders

    Inspired by ED in Are We Crazy thread I said that I believed we as a society need more inspirational leaders. Visionaries, people who can see what is needed in the world today, but perhaps more importantly, are able to communicate and influence, and help bring about the changes we need to make in the way we live our lives. I'll s2tart with 3 off the top of my head I always admired Nelson Mandela, a great man who brought about change in South Africa, going from political prisoner to president. Greta Thunberg, for her work raising awareness of climate change. Malala Yousefzai, for her courage in championing female education. Who do you class a Visionary Leader, and why?
  15. Moonsmith

    Do You Have A Sacred Animal?

    I've already contributed to this thread so can I have a cursed animal instead of a sacred one? How do I know it was cursed? Because I cursed it - twice! I have been visited tonight by a bat just before midnight - a little pip but if it was a female it probably had young so needed to leave rather than buzzing me as I tried to read. It was first cursed as I put down my kindle and hauled to my feet. Ten minutes later it was cursed again when, after eventually catching it, the ungrateful little bugger bit me as I chucked it through a window. This shall look good on the COVID Symptom Study tomorrow. Symptoms - morbid fear of water, overwhelming desire to bite necks and using a sunshade indoors.
  16. Jackal Girl

    Do You Have A Sacred Animal?

    And much overlooked, I think! How cute! I had the opportunity to hold one once. We were at a nature reserve and the guide had trapped a few in order to monitor numbers (or something similar - I can't remember now). He asked which one of us would like to be the one to release it, which involved holding it briefly in the hand before it scampered off into the undergrowth again. It was such a lovely experience.
  17. Earlier
  18. I think that is one that is unlikely to provoke the quasi condition of FOMO in my case...
  19. I'm curious now but I think I'll take your word for it!! (I had a work colleague many years ago who had being skyclad in a hailstorm on her bucket list.)
  20. In larger circles I do work robed. In that case, i have used a handmade cotton robe, tied with cord, and cloak (which was gifted to me by my HPs and was velvet - it was her own, veteran of many a ritual - but if I need one in future, I'd rather natural materials. Or waterproofed.) Skyclad is only alone or with a closely knit group. There is an element of trust, literally opening up and revealing all involved, spiritual and emotional as well as literal. It would upset the group dynamic if you didn't have what Wicca calls perfect love and perfect trust. Which is part of the reason that the initiation ritual is so powerful, on so many levels. It just wouldn't have the same impact in everyday clothing, and I feel even robes somehow lessen that glimpse of understanding how we relate to Deity. But to each their own, of course. My viewpoint is merely that. It's and interesting topic, like everything else we do, there is no right or wrong way. I will just say though, that if you haven't worked skyclad on a beach, in the pouring rain, in a thunderstorm, you are missing one of life's greatest experiences
  21. I'll take your respective words for it. I'll stick with cotton clad.
  22. hedgerose

    Do You Have A Sacred Animal?

    I think that a spirit animal kind of adopts you. Sometimes they stick around, and become almost an alter ego. But sometimes they can make themselves known for a short while, because we need to learn something and they have agreed to teach us. A shamanistic view of this would be that you are using the spirit animal magic, to bolster some quality that you lack but they have in abundance, for example. Many of the old folklore stories from all over the world have surprisingly similar themes and attributes given to spiders, say, or foxes. Ancient stories and poetry have many layers of meaning, and dreams and visions are how our subconscious mind interprets and makes connections the conscious self might miss. The little stranger that had been aheming discreetly for my attention is a wren. Actually, I was told this many years ago by one of the coven elders, but unfortunately we were both a bit tiddly-p*ssed at the time and I had forgotten. It took lockdown, of all things, for the wren to start chirping at me, reminding me to be bold, and speak out when needed.
  23. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This. Exactly.
  24. Yes, it does feel special. I've been naked without being skyclad, but never skyclad without being naked. Speaking from extremely limited experience, skyclad is a state of mind for me. It's about feeling enveloped, not exposed. When it hasn't worked (in a group collapsing with laughter or on my own wondering what on earth I'm doing) I'm just outside with my kit off. When it has worked, then skyclad feels like a really good word.
  25. "Skyclad" is a - perhaps - pretty way of saying "naked" - without clothing ... whatever! If you have experienced it in ritual practice, you will know what it means - it does feel ..... sky - clad 😄
  26. Moonsmith

    opinion

    Hi JG. blog entry "Where did 1 come from?" ED it also defines mathematical zero if that is of interest. There is lots on the internet about the origin of the number 0. A lecturer once suggested that the lack of 0 by the Romans and its adoption by the Persians was indicative of the reason that Rome built roads while the Persians drew star maps. Right mods, no more "nothing" in a thread about religion. 😆
  27. Moonsmith

    opinion

    Of course not. It doesn't put food on Joe public's table and it doesn't put a roof over Joe public's family. For you, me and those who are interested it is available.
  28. Stonehugger

    opinion

    Sounds wonderful.
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