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    1. Marketplace

      Somewhere to post queries and information about Pagan supply shops, both on and offline, and advertise your things for swap or sale. We allow limited notifications of your E-Bay adverts but don't overuse this. All deals are of course private between the individuals concerned.

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  2. The Circle (all pagans together)

    1. Starters Orders (basics)

      Ground work, foundations and basics. A good place to start for those new to paganism.
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  • Our picks

    • As the title suggests, this post and the accompanying poll are about the place of alternative medicine in modern culture. Should we be using it as a replacement for conventional medicine, as something to run alongside and compliment the conventional or not at all? Does modern life mean we have modern diseases beyond the reach of older alternative medicine?
       
      This series of questions has been somewhat sparked by the thread about why pagans 'should' embrace everything alternative and just general musings of mine brought to the forefront of my mind by the differing attitudes I see between a work colleague who uses homeopathy for everything and my partner who is by and large disdainful of alternative medicine.
       
      As for my personal view, I think that alternative medicine does have a place alongside conventional medicine as it can often help with the side effects of some conventional medicines or be used as a safer alternative for people who suffer from recurrent ailments where repeated doses of the conventional cure may do more harm than good. I am very much in favour of the use of alternative medicine to ward off and cure minor ailments such as colds, sore throats, toothache, headaches etc and the use of conventional medicine for more major or complex ailments. I suppose some of my view on this comes from personal experiences of the nasty effects of some conventional medicines such as SSRIs where alternative medicine has helped me to be able to function again and such.
       
      So what do other people think?
      • 23 replies
    • I've been reading a bit about how to reduce the waste in my household. Some things are quite straight forward but others would take a significant stepchange e.g. shopping at smaller, independent shops and bringing own containers. I would need to plan more and be more organised, which is a big ask given how busy my life is these days. I think it's going to be a case of making small shifts in the right direction and building it up until new habits are formed.

      In some respects I'm already on the right path, e.g. I used cloth nappies and wipes for my girls but I know there's so much more that I could be doing.

      Are you conscious about what ends up in your wheelie bin and have you made any changes lately? Have you swapped products or buying habits because of excess packaging or their disposable nature?
        • Like
      • 42 replies
    • I've just read an interesting article about a research project which has used artificial means to keep pig brains functioning (with capacity for normal brain activity) for up to 36 hours. 

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-43928318

      The ambition is to apply this to human brains to enable scientists to study the living brain more effectively. 

      Personally I can see the potential for benefits to humanity - future generations could have a better quality of life without succumbing to degenerative neurological conditions - but it opens up a huge ethics debate around the nature of the research itself and the potential for misuse in practical application down the line. At present we have no way of knowing if there is any form of consciousness in the test subjects and if so whether it causes distress or suffering to the individual. Is it just a functioning organ or is it the vessel for a conscious being? Surely the only way of knowing would be if scientists were to conduct a successful human brain transplant, and this research has arguably unlatched the gate to that path. 

      I found the research exciting and fascinating, and a little bit frightening. I imagine many people of a religious persuasion will have very strong opinions.

      What's your thoughts?
      • 9 replies
    • Right then how best to phrase the question......

      I've noticed on here there's quite a number of different belief sets(as you'd expect!)and although some seem to have set rituals and celebrations many are (as mine) an amalgamation of different"paths" and I'm curious as to whether people consider there beliefs" religious"..... for my own part I don't consider my beliefs religious,they are opinions formed from what I'd term spiritual experiences but are not in and of themselves religious

      Secondly how do you all define " religion" (don't go to Google I can do that myself I'm looking for your personal definition,how YOU define what's religious and what's simply belief).....does religion require texts,if it has them should they (the word of God/god's/deities ect)be followed to the letter and if you believe not then why when the instructions come from what you believe to be a higher,sacred source?.....if you don't follow the teachings or doctrine of your chosen path( if it has such) how do you justify discarding the parts you deem wrong?
      • 42 replies
    • A bit of a clumsy question but I'm at the end of a long day with my two young children so my ability to articulate is a bit limited.

      I've just caught up with an old thread about Christian pagans and something said by Moonsmith got me thinking about belief in deities and how/why people interpret them in the way that they do. I consider myself to be an atheist and a pagan but Moonsmith's description of him/herself (sorry, I don't want to presume gender) as believing in a non-anthropomorthic deity struck a chord with me and now has me questioning my understanding of my own beliefs. I'm beginning to think I must have a very narrow view of what constitutes deity.

      I respect the belief in anthropomorphic deities but I've always struggled with the idea, particularly the notion of interventionist gods. And for that reason I've defaulted to self identifying as atheist. But now I'm wondering if that's lazy of me; if the connection I feel for the natural world is a connection to something that could be described as deity - energy, life force, creator, connecting all things - without it being anthropomorphised. 

      I'd really love to hear the thoughts of others on this subject. What's your perception of deity? Have you always felt that way? Have you challenged your own beliefs? Why does your belief (or lack thereof) make sense to you? 

      Thank you x 
      • 19 replies
  • Popular Contributors

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      Blackbird
      Blackbird
      11
    2. 2
      Moonsmith
      Moonsmith
      9
    3. 3
      OdinsDaughter64
      OdinsDaughter64
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      hedgerose
      hedgerose
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      Stonehugger
      Stonehugger
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  • Posts

    • OdinsDaughter64
      Rose , your post was so well expressed, the way you described it made me see it with my mental eye! I am Fortunate to live closer to the country side. Closer to the country side meaning not on the main land but on one of the islands on the west coast. If I write or say "I live on an island! I have the feeling people tend to expect Im in the middle of nowhere and  have to row to get my shopping or something.. But no, there is a LOT of urban life which I wot talk about in this post. Id like to express my gratitude to the landscapes I have nearby. Your story about wildlife is one I deeply care about.  We should leave the wildlife as it is. If we would then more animals would return to the wild, the same with the flora and fauna. I used to live closer to wild nature where I could see eagles soaring. Sometimes an owl visited my garden. There was a wild streaming river which I miss still. The sound of it was like nothing else. There also is an area where you can walk which has lakes and you come to this hairpin path going up and look into a fabulous landscape. If the local community would advertise for it I am sure this would be a route that would be visited even more. Not many take the whole route though cause its a steep one.   A local farmer said he has seen the Gaupe, or norwegian lynx there. This is a very small version of a lynx so its really like a big cat. How i would love to see one of these in its natural environment. Seeing these animals return to the local wildlife is great. Lets hope we humans will keep it this way!
    • hedgerose
      I have, or maybe had, a crow. I have interacted with him in meditations and dreams. But spiritually, I went through an odd patch around the change of life, adjusting to the upheaval. A time of necessary change, and things do tend to shuffle and change position and priority. As a result, the bond I had with him has not been as strong in recent years, he's still there in the background, but seems to have withdrawn. I have been getting the sense of something much smaller, still a bird I think, but I'm not certain, whoever it is hasn't made themselves known fully yet. But something has been tugging at the edge of my awareness recently.  In lockdown, I am lucky the area supports a lot of wildlife, despite being urban, I'm on the edge of semi rural part. I pay attention to the birds and the trees, I even saw a fox the other morning. There is also the river, which has been important to my family for years. My father as a boy, and myself with the children, have lived near the Ely river along different stretches of it, but within a short walk away. Now I'm right at the mouth, nearest I've ever been. (There are cycle paths along there apparently, but I wouldn't like to tackle them without help. Someone who can advise me I'm too close to the edge, grab me if I wobble and if necessary jump in after me. Perhaps not, then.) Part of the unexpected consequence of all this has been the tightening of focus on a restricted area, and more wildlife has been encouraged by the quiet streets to wander closer to us than before. Things do seem to be picking up though, even here, so that probably won't last much longer.  
    • OdinsDaughter64
      Yes I have some sacred animals whom I seek guidance from and some of these give me new inspiration. One of te most powerful impressions was when i was a child. We went to this pond in the forest. It was a warm summers day and above the heat the sun shone  pearlescent light upon the water. Dragonflies were dancing hanging on the invisible strings of that moment so Id choose them. they have literally opened my eyes by showing their humble beauty.
    • Earthdragon
      Surrly all this has something to do with quantum? (My idea of doing your funny but am actually being serious too 🤔🤓)
    • Moonsmith
      Warning.  Boring old fart taking centre stage.  No fun involved. Feel free to ignore. It's just that somewhere above in this interminable thread, I quoted Tegmark (2018) on mattter and consciousness and suggested that a conscious universe was a logical extension of his conjecture. The cover article above moves forward with some mathematical conjectures and conjectural models for consciousness from several mathematicians. It might back my view of Pantheism - it could explain a thought that I had about 30 years ago that human/DNA consciousness might eclipse the universal consciousness.  However,  I have always said that ideas are ten a penny.  It's only when either the maths backs them up or they become predictive that they are of any use.   This article might demonstrate Pantheism but at least one of the models might more usefully demonstrate animism.  Throughout the article work which contradicts or rejects the above is quoted, referenced and included. Its just conjecture but a step that helps my ever changing thinking regarding my belief set. please someone - say something funny!!!!!!
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