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mystical_moon

Books That Aren't Twaddle

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mystical_moon

Hey :)

 

Following from the Twaddle Spotting, spotting b*llsh*t in books post,

 

I was wondering if you could all recommend a book each that wasn't Twaddle, if such a thing exsists :)

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mystical_moon

Nah,

 

I was just interested to see any that anyone could recommend.. seemed everyone had a book for twaddle... so just wanted to see what kind of things people read :)

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Pomona

Anything by Ronald Hutton :)

  • Like 1

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Guest Herneoakshield

Owen Davies is generally a good author as well, particularly his "Cunning-Folk, Popular Magic in English History " book.

 

I also recommend "Witchcraft a Tradition Renewed" by Even John Jones

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Guest Quasizoid

I personally find "scientific method" is the first step to getting one's sense of symmetry worked out. What I mean by this is, when looking into history, see what the archeological evidence is. Say for instance, you want to understand the mindset behind the myths of ancient Greek gods and heros...then the "in-depth" expert in that area is a fellow named "Karl Kerenyi":

 

http://www.world-literature.com/Gods_of_th...0500270481.html

 

Imagine yourself in that time, how they lived, what they ate, their activities, how they worked, their code of ethics, how they perceived things, etc...the rest is then just a matter of following your heart and your instincts. ;)

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mystical_moon

Very interesting method Quasizoid,

 

Thanks guys ;)

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Guest Thinair

Pick any one off my shelf, I pride myself on ditching the twaddle :D

 

446301793_f24c855b2b.jpg

 

:D

 

A few of my most prized are perhaps C. L'Estrange Ewen's Witchcraft and Demonianism - A Concise Account Derived from Sworn Depositions and Confessions Obtained in the Courts of England and Wales. Which is a phenomenal account of just about every witchcraft trial across most of the UK ever lol Quite an undertaking but insanely useful for research. 10th from the left on the top shelf (yellowy one)

 

J.Omosade Awolalu's Yoruba Beliefs and Sacrificial Rites which is a good, solid ethnographic academic work on Yorubaland Vodoun (not currently displayed as it was on loan at the time).

 

Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism by Chogyam Trungpa. Perhaps the least twaddley book ever written by a human being ever. A starting point for all human spiritual development...(left-hand-side, upright)

 

The Spirit of Shamanism by Roger N. Walsh and The Way of the Shaman by Mike Harner - both good works on shamanism (bottom left-hand corner)

 

Anything by James Lovelock starting with the classic on Gaian Theory.

 

Be Here Now by Dr. Richard Alpert AKA Baba Ram Das. An absolute classic on LSD-25 as entheogen. Incredibly entertaining, insightful and human. Good representation of an era.

 

And....ummm... gods. I wouldn't know where to stop :P

 

Okay, one last one that I personally like, though I know many who don't, would be Patrick Tierney's The Highest Alter: The Story of Human Sacrifice. Very interesting anthropological piece focused on South American shamanism.

 

*stops for breath* So, ummn...yurs....that's my 'one' recommendation lol ;)

 

Pray I never get stuck on a desert island, the rescue boat would sink under all the books i'd take :D

 

----------------------------------------------------------------

 

In books on shelves my gods are stacked,

In sentences, words and lines,

On every page is sanctity wrote

Encased: the antiquity of time.

My helpful gods and Celtic heroes

Fill the highest shelves,

Whilst down below I keep the beasts,

Fomorii, goblins, elves.

I could not break the pristine covers,

To preserve them, non are read.

So although these books are weighed with knowledge,

There’s nothing in my head.

 

- Paper Gods

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mystical_moon

wow!

 

I just had to show my bf that pic of ALL your books to prove to him that mine little collection isn't THAT bad lol!

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Moonhunter

any and all folklore of any culture

 

anything by Katherine Briggs or Christine Hole

 

Ronald Hutton: Triumph of the Moon, Stations of the Sun or The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles

 

anything by Kathleen Herbert or Stephen Pollington (Heathenry)

 

anything by Nora Chadwick (Celtic) or H R Ellis Davidson (Celtic/Heathen)

 

The Dictionary of Celtic Mythology by James MasKillop

 

A Dictionary of English Folklore (OUP)

 

A Dictionary of Superstitions (Opie and Tatem, OUP)

 

any and all genuine texts pertaining to pre-Christian cultures (Sacred Texts is a good online resource)

 

all decent historical resources about any particular culture

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Guest Thinair
wow!

 

I just had to show my bf that pic of ALL your books to prove to him that mine little collection isn't THAT bad lol!

170399[/snapback]

 

Ah, alas, 'tis but the beginning. It was inspired by my friend who is a true heathen shaman of the bogs. He lives in a room which is ceiling-to-floor books. Not a gap between 'em. Hundreds, and not one of them complete twaddle (well, maybe one perhaps). Many first editions and all occult works. It's what I base my meagre efforts on :rolleyes:

 

However, the above isn't all occult I’m afraid, so it's a slight cheat. There's a small but very well selected section on Deaf culture and sign language (the 15-odd stacked against the left of the book case) and a number of classic works of literature and poetry (the four stacks to the far left), but I reason most of them have a slight pagan connection anyway so that's acceptable. To the far right are a number of back issues of Pebble (Rollright Trust *spits*), Pagan Dawn (*spits*), Sacred Hoop, HedgeWytch, Psychic Times, White Dragon and Fortean Times. And just because I desperately want to waste some time because I can't face doing this daft presentation, I’ll stick a link to each of them :blink: (except Pebble, which probably doesn't exist anymore and besides, supporting that cause would be wrong in every way and my moral fibres would snap and I’d die).

 

White Dragon was/is quite a good read, specifically aimed at the Mercian region but heavy on folklore. Fortean Times is always good for a laugh, if Fox Mulder could have been a magazine editor...

 

Best wishes,

 

Marion :)

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Guest Thinair
any and all folklore of any culture

 

Lol, your use of the words 'any' and 'anything' disturb me :rolleyes: There are many works on folklore etc. that I would strongly recommend go straight in the 'twaddle' bin :blink:

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weatherwitch

The older the book on folklore the more you find the things that have already been forgotten and been over looked by more modern authors :(

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Moonhunter

White Dragon was/is quite a good read, specifically aimed at the Mercian region but heavy on folklore. Fortean Times is always good for a laugh, if Fox Mulder could have been a magazine editor...

170428[/snapback]

 

heh. thanks for the backhanded compliment.

 

I tend to write articles for WD on either Stone age stuff or Merlin. :(

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Guest pasher

Nicolas Remy's, "Demonolatry". One of the great classics of witch hunting which was used as a manual by many, if not most, European inquisitors.

 

Anything by Katharine Briggs relating to folklore.

 

R. Chambers. "Book of Days, A Miscellany of Popular Antiquities in Connection with the Calendar". 2 Volumes.

Packed to overflowing with useful and interesting snippets of information. In my view, anyone interested in folklore should have a copy.

 

Audrey Shore Henshall. "The Chambered Tombs of Scotland". 2 Volumes.

This is probably the most comprehensive work ever written on the tombs of Scotland.

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Moonhunter
Lol, your use of the words 'any' and 'anything' disturb me :( There are many works on folklore etc. that I would strongly recommend go straight in the 'twaddle' bin  ;)

170430[/snapback]

 

I mean real folklore, not comments on it. The genuine folk tales of the people, not people's idea of What People Believed Back then. :o_lol:

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Guest Thinair
I mean real folklore, not comments on it. The genuine folk tales of the people, not people's idea of What People Believed Back then.  :(

170499[/snapback]

 

How much 'real foloklore' was ever put into words by those who believed it and lived it? By its very nature, folklore is the partner of illiteracy. Some later attempts may have been made, but mostly from the Victorian era on, but people passing through or anthropologists. :o_lol:

 

Best wishes,

 

Marion.

Edited by Thinair

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fizzyclare1
I personally find "scientific method" is the first step to getting one's sense of symmetry worked out.  What I mean by this is, when looking into history, see what the archeological evidence is.  Say for instance, you want to understand the mindset behind the myths of ancient Greek gods and heros...then the "in-depth" expert in that area is a fellow named "Karl Kerenyi":

 

http://www.world-literature.com/Gods_of_th...0500270481.html

 

Imagine yourself in that time, how they lived, what they ate, their activities, how they worked, their code of ethics, how they perceived things, etc...the rest is then just a matter of following your heart and your instincts. :o_grouphug:

170360[/snapback]

 

 

can't beat that approach, noffink like a bit of critical thinking and digging around in the muck! fizzy

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davkin

One Heathen's non-twaddle list

 

Dictionary of Northern Mythology by Rudolph Simek

Ecclesiastical History of the English People by Bede

Egils Saga

Futhark by Edred Thorsson

Germania by Tacitus

Gods and Myths of Northern Europe by H.R. Ellis Davidson

Grettirs Saga

Heims Kringla The Norse Kings Saga by Snorre Sturluson

History of the Danes by Saxo Grammaticus

History of the Vikings by Gwyn Jones

Looking for the Lost Gods of England by Kathleen Herbert

Lost Gods of England by Brian Branston

Myth and Religion of the North by E.O.G. Turville-Petre

Njals Saga

Norse Myths by Kevin Crossley-Holland

Our Troth by The Ring of Troth & Other True Folk

Poetic Edda Translated by Lee Milton Hollander / Carolyne Larrinton among many

Prose Edda Anthony Faulkes translation. Everyman's Classic Library

Road to Hel by H.R. Ellis Davidson

Rudiments of Rune Lore by S. Pollington

Runelore by Edred Thorsson

Runes by Ralph Elliot

Saga of the Volsungs

Teutonic Magic by Kveldulfr Gundarsson

Teutonic Mythology by Jacob Grimm

Teutonic Religion by Kveldulf Gundarsson

Well and the Tree by Paul Bauschatz

 

Heathen Gods in Old English Literature. Richard North

The Cult of Kingship in Anglo-Saxon England. William A Chaney

Rites and Religions of the Anglo-Saxons Gale R. Owen

 

Witchcraft in England 1559 - 1618 Editor Barbara Rosen

Persuasions of the Witches Craft, Ritual Magic in Contemporary England by T M Luhrman

 

 

 

dav

Edited by davkin
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Moonhunter
How much 'real foloklore' was ever put into words by those who believed it and lived it? By its very nature, folklore is the partner of illiteracy. Some later attempts may have been made, but mostly from the Victorian era on, but people passing through or anthropologists. :D

170504[/snapback]

 

Hmmm...I wonder if we're talking about the same thing?

 

one online definition (which seems acceptable at first glance) is:

  1.  The traditional beliefs, myths, tales, and practices of a people, transmitted orally.

  2. The comparative study of folk knowledge and culture. Also called folkloristics.

  3.

        1. A body of widely accepted but usually specious notions about a place, a group, or an institution: Rumors of their antics became part of the folklore of Hollywood.

        2. A popular but unfounded belief.

 

When I talk about 'folklore' in this context I mean the myths and tales of a people.

 

The folklore bit in terms of practices needs to be taken sideways, as there's far more of 3 above than the genuine article expressed in 1. IME, to do one's own research to tell fact from popular (especially in pagan circles) fiction.

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Guest nacht

And I thought I had quite a few books!

 

Can't think of too many off the top of my head, but

 

"The Druids" by Peter Berresford Ellis for focusing on a specific subject and "The Modern Pagan" by Brian Day for a general overview of non-spiritual paganism today. Both stick out in my mind for being excellently written and well-researched.

 

On the subject of folklore, I'm lucky enough to have both volumes of Hazzlitt's "Dictionary of Faiths and Folklore" which are great sources of obscure and forgotten traditions.

 

If anyone here lives in Warwickshire, I'd also recommend Roy Palmers "Folklore Of Warwickshire" which covers an awful lot of traditions and superstitions in these parts.

Edited by nacht

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Guest Wulfric

Ditto most of Davkins list.

 

Would also include most of Nigel Pennicks works. Don't always agree with him but always a fascinating read.

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Guest Ameniatha

Interesting lists, on my personal shelf I have Scott Cunningham, Ray Buckland, Raven Grimassi, Ann Moura, Marian Green, Vivian Crowley, Edain McCoy and Ronald Hutton....

 

In my e-books collection I have Gerald Gardner, Varg Vikernes, Margaret Murray and also Marian Green..

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Guest Tas Mania

The Mabinogion

Carmina Gadelica

The Gnostic Bible

The Bible

The Tao of Physics

The Black Goddess and the Sixth Sense

The Qran

The Ark and the Covenant

A Strange and Secret People

ALL of Terry Pratchett's works!

Old fairy stories too.

 

And umpteen others on various aspects of religion and archeology, and geomancy, plus herbals and natural medicine stuff, plus anything to do with referencing!

And of course Sacred Texts online... ;)

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mystical_moon

Sorry, whats sacred Texts online? :lol:

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Guest Tas Mania
Sorry, whats sacred Texts online? :P

179763[/snapback]

 

 

Basically, an online library service, stuffed to the ceilings with all things occultly and religiously and mythologically amazing, interesting, fabulous - ooooh - just LOVE this site!

 

http://www.sacred-texts.com/index.htm

 

Also good for reference is this one: Bartleby.

http://www.bartleby.com/212/index.html#17

 

ENJOY! :lol:

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Guest The Old Girl

My personal favourite is 13 Moons by Fiona Walker Craven. This is an awesome book and sadly Hagstone the group the book advertises at the back of the book no longer take students which is a crying shame! :lol:

 

Try and get a copy as it is now out of print! :P

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Guest Avalon
446301793_f24c855b2b.jpg

170396[/snapback]

woah.. can you feel my envy from here?

 

---

 

I'd like to recommend two:

 

'Wicca' by Vivienne Crowley

An excellent starting point for those interested and/or starting out on the path.

 

'Witchfinder' by Malcom Gaskill

A devestating and highly sensitive account of the tragic English witch hunt.

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Guest Suliwyensis

I have, I admit, twaddle on my shelves. Mainly because peers said the books were crap and that I shouldn't read them which automaticaly makes me want to because I don't like being told what to think. However they are invariably right :huh:

 

On the nontwaddle side of things... Phylis Curott - Witchcrafting. It didn't even get on to the subject of spells until the latter part of the book, One of the things that screams twaddle to me is how quickly they mention spells "Yeah there's this Goddess and a God and stuff but ignore that and let's do some mega-cool spells!!!"

 

I agree about Ronald Hutton, anything by him is good. He's got a new one out now about Druids, it's only available as a hardback at the moment though.

 

I really like Ellen Hawke, I don't agree with everything she says (I never do) but she has a lovely way of writing and really conveys the emotion of the craft rather than just how to carry out the motions.

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Guest Swanhild

I will add my vote for Ron Hutton and everything on Davkin's list :P

 

Would also add two new releases - The Book of Seithr by Runic John - excellent introduction to Heathen magic. And a good introduction to Heathenry - Heathen Paths by Pete Jennings.

 

Skegga :o_perv:

Edited by Swanhild

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