Jump to content
Haylee Linton

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

Superstitions - ...or are they?


Guest Athena
 Share

Recommended Posts

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

sith dont be so qiuck to dismiss alot of superstition is built on fact best not to ride rough shot just because you feel it has no meaning to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, although a lot of superstition is based on a lack of knowledge about how the world works, not all of it is an and many came from practicalilities - even if those practicalilities are no longer relevent - although not walking under ladders could be said to be common-sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whistling in the Theatre is bad luck and at sea as well. Both to do with safety issues as I remember. Way back, stage hands would whistle to each other for command signals etc, so it was not a good idea to whistle, a piece of scenery could be swung down onto the stage by mistake.

 

The sea whistling is said to whistle up a troublesome storm.

 

You must never speak of "the Scottish play whilst in the theatre" for it is considered bad luck.

 

This superstition goes back to the days when rep companys would resort to "the scottish play" if any particular play etc wasn't getting bums on seats apparently. So it was considered bad luck to say the "M" word for fear of a bad run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cant believe how many people beleve this rubbish about superstitions its all just nonsense

240406[/snapback]

 

:o_devil:

 

If you took the time to acutally read the thread, like Opal said, you would see that a lot of superstitions come from fact, they are in some ways, a passing on of traditions. Safety advice... if you will.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see I have gotten several peoples backs up, im sorry I will think before typing next time.

 

Oh and pantheist MACBETH!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sea whistling is said to whistle up a troublesome storm.

 

 

Whistling is banned in Portsoy for the next two weeks, 'cos the boat festival is on...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Walking under a ladder: lynch mobs used to arrange for hangings to be carried out with the victim presented himself walking about his usual haunts. Ladders would be used as impromptu gibbets. You don't walk under a ladder in case someone drops a noose over your head. Pretty compelling, I'd say.

238544[/snapback]

 

 

My gran once told me that one of her sisters died when she was little when the ladder she was walking under fell on her, so I've avoided them ever since. Also thanks for the white rabbits info, I often wondered where that one came from.

 

If a black cat crosses your path you will have bad luck

I can only guess that this goes back to the Witch trails.But left to right or right to left for good or bad luck?

 

We get the english word 'sinister' from the Roman augurs who believed that a bird or animal crossing from left to right was bad luck. As for black cats, they are either lucky or unlucky, depeding on which part of the country you are from. Any black animal was believed to be a witch's familiar, and therefore unlucky at one time, and for its owner, it may well have been!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fishermen don't like to see a red haired woman before setting out and many would refuse to set sail. The red hair I presume was a mark of Witch, and combine that with a whistling woman, and she could no doubt whistle up the winds.

 

On Mull, black cats were considered evil.

 

In Dundee, a lass on her hen night would be dressed as the bride, with a pal dressed as the groom, her face blackened, and the bride-to-be had to carry a chamber pot full of salt with a doll baby buried in it. There was also a cacophony made throughout the pub crawl, using spoons banged on tin plates/trays, also bells rung. A right old racket!

People would gift pennies too.

 

If your ear itches, it's meant to signify someone talking about you: left was your lover - right, your mother.

 

If gifting a knife or sharp object, scissors etc, the receiver MUST first give over silver as a token payment. Otherwise the friendship's severed.

 

Silver was used to do many things, and cures were effected by washing in water in which a silver coin had been placed, but the water had to come from a place crossed by both the living and the dead.

 

In Wales, a corpse was laid out for the wake with a pile of salt on its breast. The "sin eater" came in first and ate his fill from the funeral feast, but had to season it using the salt, thus eating the sins of the departed.

 

A knife falling to the floor meant a male stranger would call.

 

Until relatively recently (early 1900's) many Islanders would lay an extra place at table for the Stranger. They believed that the Christ walked among them in the guise of a stranger, and were ready to welcome Him should He call needing food and shelter.

Edited by Tas Mania
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Walking under a ladder: lynch mobs used to arrange for hangings to be carried out with the victim presented himself walking about his usual haunts. Ladders would be used as impromptu gibbets. You don't walk under a ladder in case someone drops a noose over your head. Pretty compelling, I'd say.

238544[/snapback]

 

 

My gran once told me that one of her sisters died when she was little when the ladder she was walking under fell on her, so I've avoided them ever since. Also thanks for the white rabbits info, I often wondered where that one came from.

 

If a black cat crosses your path you will have bad luck

I can only guess that this goes back to the Witch trails.But left to right or right to left for good or bad luck?

 

We get the english word 'sinister' from the Roman augurs who believed that a bird or animal crossing from left to right was bad luck. As for black cats, they are either lucky or unlucky, depeding on which part of the country you are from. Any black animal was believed to be a witch's familiar, and therefore unlucky at one time, and for its owner, it may well have been!

241841[/snapback]

 

I heard that the devil's side is left so a black cat walking towards the left is walking to the devil therefore is of the devil.

Curious that Sinistro in italian means 'left' as well as 'sinister'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, 'sinister' is Latin for 'left' and Italian is Latin with a funny accent.

 

Sinister, dexter, sinister, dexter, sinister, dexter, maniple... maniple terminate!*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Apologies for the bad grammar, but I can't remember what sort of verb it is...

Edited by Inverurie Jones
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never piss off a witch, for waking up in the morning, in the shape of a newt, is bothersome.

 

Q

207628[/snapback]

 

I like that one - it made me laugh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Whistling ones.

Its bad luck to whistle in a thearter - Comes from a lot of Therar riggers being old sailors they knew the ropes and communcated on the sailing ships with whistles, so any extra wistling would be dangerous.

 

Also Its consided bad luck to Whsitle in Shopping Acades as Pickpockes would communicate with a whistling code.

 

I allways understood that it was Bad Luck to put shoes on the table as it referred to the Laying out of the Corpse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my mum is very superstitious,she reckons the devil sits on your left shoulder,if you spill salt you must throw some over the left shoulder to ward off the devil,she also wont have playing cards in the house as these are bad uck im not sure why though,the only thing i link it to is the use of playing cards for doing Tarot readings,anyone else heard of this

she also says that if you give someone a purse as a gift you have to put a silver coin in the purse or its bad luck

Edited by morbidia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard the mirror one was because silver (which was very expensive) was used to back the sheet of glass to make it a mirror, hence breaking it was throwing money away.

 

The black cat, I was always told was bad luck, due to it being the witch's familiar, since I'm the witch I would assume that it's good luck most of the time, unless it's in the house because that means I forgot to close the door and she's probably left a stinky "present" for me somewhere in the house :lol:

 

I suffer from compulsive behaviour, not as much now but it did get chronic in younger days, the don't step on a crack one caused all sorts of odd behaviour, the pavement on the way to school was badly broken up so avoiding the cracks was difficultenough but my compulsiveness made me have to have stepped over the same number of cracks with each leg by the time I got to school, eg 20 left leg, 20 right leg, to the point where I was changing my stride to make sure I got it right, I was a very od child :blink:

 

Magpies are one of my creatures that I connect with, hence my next tattoo, but originally the idea for 2 magpies was so I never saw just one :lol:

 

I have heard most of those superstitions before, it's nice to se the real meanings behind them. The meanings so often get lost that we are left with little rituals eg. salute the magpie, that we don't know why we do them.

 

Oh and the touch wood one is still one of my compulsions, no idea why, just feeling of dread if I don't :lol:

Don't worry, I'm getting help :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fishermen don't like to see a red haired woman before setting out and many would refuse to set sail.
That must have messed up the economy in Islay when you lived there Tas!

 

And Woozle,

Curious that Sinistro in italian means 'left' as well as 'sinister'.

Not really. "sinister" is Latin for "left" so "sinistro" is not surprising.

 

But, because of superstition about left-handed people and maybe "the left-handed way" it also came to mean an association with "dark" or "occult" and so the word "sinister" took on its alternative meaning.

Edited by andy9xyz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Spitting on your money before placing a bet is considered to bring good luck. Also when buying lottery tickets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spitting on your money before placing a bet is considered to bring good luck.  Also when buying lottery tickets.

245139[/snapback]

 

I do my lottery on-line. Who's got the screen wipes ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dont know if i believe superstitions but i figure there no point tempting fate is there.

 

Red sky at night, shepards delight, red sky in the morning shepards warning (though here in wales it always rains so....not so much)

 

Oak before ash, your in for a splash, ash before oak, your in for a soak

 

I throw salt over my sholuder when i spill, careful not to smash mirrors, walking over an even amount of drains is good luck, odd is bad luck but drains scare me so i dont walk over any, a ladybird will fly in the direction of your true love. I have 2 black cats so i dont worry too much bout that one :).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Superstitions occur where people have lost the reason why something was originally done and are trying to fill the void.

Or in some cases there was no original action and the human brain feels the need to fill the void.

 

Regards, Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Here's one that I always get told off for doing.

 

It's bad luck to leave a loaf of bread upside down on the kitchen table!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
Here's one that I always get told off for doing.

 

It's bad luck to leave a loaf of bread upside down on the kitchen table!

247272[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

 

iv heard of most of the superstitions and grew up with them lol i dunno who or what mom n dad where afraid of lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

An old thread but a good one. I read a magazine recently with some absolute gems, all based around Scotland:

 

Cutting a baby's nails with scissors will make it dishonest.

 

Just before the birth of a baby a round of cheese should be bought and the howdie (midwife) should cut it after delivery.

 

Eggs should not be sold after sunset

 

Rinsing the milking pail in a trout stream will diminish milk production.

 

Weddings never took place in the Highlands during the week beginning 3rd May (for unknown reasons)

 

The Bride and Bridegroom should lie on the floor and have their feet blackened with soot.

 

Cut hair blown into an empty bird nest will result in a headache for the newly-shorn

 

These - and many others - seem nonsensical but they were probably all rooted in some truth somewhere.

 

Some though to me smack of sympathetic Magick. Covering the mirrors in a house and stopping the clocks to prevent the departing ghost from becoming confused and wanting to stay. A strange dog bringing new friendship (well, there are so many stories of people meeting over dog-walking excursions). Seeing a funeral procession on the way to a wedding being bad luck for the married couple. Sisters of sailors at sea being prohibited from cutting their hair - there are so many stories about witches conjuring up storms by unfastening their hair that this would seem a natural extension. Hebridean fishermen refused to wear clothes dyed with lichen, or have a green plant on board ship, claiming that the clothes and plant wanted to return to the land.

 

I find superstitions fascinating because in the weird and wonderful there is the germ of Magick.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My husband claimed if you see a nun on the way to the bookies you won't win anything but I think that just seemed to happen a lot because there was a convent near where we lived at the time and therefore he was not only statistically unlikely to win, but also likely to see a nun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My grandfather (trawlerman) used to say that it was unlucky to see a red-haired woman on the way to the boat to go to sea.

 

He claimed that this was proven, because one of his mates saw a red-haired woman on the way to the boat and took off after her. The boat couldn't sail because they couldn't find a replacement at short notice and they all lost money.......*

 

*My grandmother claimed that if she had an aurar (small Icelandic coin) for every time she'd heard a version of that story she'd be a wealthy woman, so I have my doubts! :o_wink2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Just watched a programmed about sport and superstition. The people who stand up just before England score, so then they have to spend the rest of the game stood up. People think that they can directly affect an external situation, where as in reality it is pure luck.

I am not overly superstitious myself, however I feel some traditional concepts are hard to ignore. However, I am VERY superstitious about my dice.....if anyone dares to touch them, I will assume they are cursed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh no SarahKel we can't share dice... That's heresy... I tend to salute and whistle at Magpies... And have to remember not to whistle in the theatre...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always thought Bless you came from the time of the plague when sneezing was one thought to be of the 1st signs you were developing it.

I thought I wasn't very superstitious at all yet when it rained today I immediately blamed everyone who had said it was to hot so I guess I must be to some degree :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Nettle
      I have only ever been a Christian on paper lol. When visiting hospitals I would give the CofE answer when asked about my beliefs. I didn‚Äôt really even know what it meant. As a child I often prayed to God. But could probably count on two hands the amount of times I have attended church. Obviously at school I sang hymns¬†and recited the Lord‚Äôs Prayer. But I never went deep into it. My family is not religious. I have never been deeply influenced by Christianity. I have always been spiritual though. The weirdest thing is when I started on this journey it actually allowed me to gain deeper understanding of the Christ spirit. For many years I sought a shamanic technique¬†called the ‚Äúfierce eye‚Ä̬†technique. This technique as I believed at the time would allow me to command any spirit. I could banish them or destroy them at a glance. My long search for this technique allowed me to find and connect with many interesting things but never allowed me to unravel¬†the mysteries of the fierce eye technique. One day I had vision. In the vision - between the two doors - I saw a man standing at the corner of a street near to where I live. It was daytime but there was nothing else around. Nothing moved. It was as if every living thing was¬†asleep. I approached the man who as I was drawing closer turned to regard my approach. What I saw blew my mind away. The love I felt emanating from this strangers eyes was so powerful, so all consuming, utterly accepting¬†that I fell to my knees and started weeping with happiness. The love was so unconditional, so total and all encompassing. It took my breath away. I eventually awakened from this vision thinking what the hell was that all about? I did not realise until later that I had been shown the ‚Äúfierce eye‚ÄĚ technique. I had been mistaken in my assumptions as to what the ‚Äúfierce eye‚Ä̬†technique was all about. It was not about destroying something,¬†Commanding something¬†or even banishing something. It‚Äôs power lies in acceptance. I later realised that the being I had seen in my vision was the Christ spirit. The Christ spirit is also a Great Fool.¬† Who would have believed it,¬†that I would find¬†Christ following a pagan path lol. The irony was fitting. And made me realise just how limited I had allowed myself to be. The few times I have gone to church recently since this experience¬†(my son used to attend a CofE school) I feel very happy. Overjoyed even. A little mischievous.¬†I know I am welcome there even though I do not take up the mantle of Christian. I feel at home, accepted, even though I am a pagan. I feel very¬†welcome within the church.
    • Nettle
      I have several. Stone rabbit is one of my guides. He is a stone around the size of a medium sized hand, that is in the shape of a rabbits head (in profile) that I found many years ago and kept. On one side he has a mark that looks like an open eye, on the other side it looks as if he has lost that eye. Stone rabbit is master at navigating mazes/webways. When I want him to see something within the mundane I turn his head so his eye can observe. If I am going on a journey I have his lost eye side observing. He comes on my walks with me and I carry him in a bag around my neck.
    • Roundtuit
      Thank you.  Yes, I'm starting to think it's the journey that matters.   What a gorgeous image!  I'd love to get back to the fells, there's something new around very corner there.    
    • Stonehugger
      I've had varying degrees and natures of commitment to Christianity since I was at school but I've also always had pagan leanings and for quite a long time now my path has been entirely pagan. It's unproblematic in that my family and friends think it's harmless eccentricity, but I imagine it would be different if I took a strongly pagan stance on something. For me personally it's important to listen to what's going on around me and work out my path accordingly, so I celebrate the presence of many paths up the same mountain and have no concerns about reaching the top. I imagine that, like almost any walk in the fells, what currently looks like the top is just another place to see the next top from. Definitely!! ūüėĀ
    • Ellinas
      Well, I've been called many things in my time... I'm also a former Christian, with a chequered history (Anglican, in the guise of the Church in Wales, then Plymouth Brethren with the odd foray into the Baptists along the way).  I fell out with Christianity in the early 2000's, when I was late 30's, early 40's. Since then, the general nature of my meanderings has remained fairly constant, but the details and contents have changed over time.  That's fine.  The journey is the issue, not the destination.  Ithaca calls, but Phoenician markets and Egyptian cities have the greater import (poetic reference - just means follow your path and hope to arrive late, if at all).  What I believe tomorrow may be very different to what I believe today.  What I believed yesterday is just a stepping stone. In short, don't worry about what you have been, as it is merely the pathway that got you to what you are, and don't worry about where you are going, there are any number of bye-ways for you to explore. As to others - I have struggled with family pressures and the tyranny of monotheistic faith.  I understand your position and have no issue with a softly-softly approach such as you describe.  In fact, it is the best way unless you are prepared to create and weather a family rift. Dangerous statement.  Talk about tempting fate...!
×
×
  • Create New...