Jump to content
Galaemar Laerareon

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

A Question To The Heathens Out Here... - a simple question


Guest Pigwidget
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have stuck this here in case I get accused of fluffy, bunny-hood :D

 

Just a quick, and hopefully not too stupid a question, but something that's been bothering me more and more the closer we get - do heathens celebrate Winter Nights on the 1st full moon following the autumn equinox or do you celebrate on Oct 31st/Hallow's Eve?

 

I have found examples of both from Heathen, Anglo-Saxon and Asatru sites and have got rather confused in the process! I'm just trying to find out as I am interested in comparing how the heathen and non-heathen seasonal cycles compare.

 

Dazed & confused,

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

erm not that i know all that much but it would make more sense to celebrate it on the full moon because the calendar wasnt in use when the first Heathens celebrated it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...but it would make more sense to celebrate it on the full moon because the calendar wasnt in use when the first Heathens celebrated it...

Couldn't the same be said for the celtic festival of Samhain? And if so, why/when did they switch from a lunar to solar date, being that they were not Christian?

 

Davkin - thanks, I found that very same piece of info - ahh, yes, the veritable Bede! - So, what's your preference, if you don't mind my asking?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Hi.

Here in Sweden most heathens celebrate Jul on 21 december.In november,most celebrate Alvablot,who for some is both a blot for the Alver as well as dead relatives.

In folklore,Jul was however the time when dead relatives returned back home,slept in their old beds,took a bath and ate festive food.For that reason,the living slept that night in hay on the floor,and went to bed early so the dead could have their old home for themselves.And I myself go with that today,and celebrate Alvablot exclusivly as a feast for the fertility in my home-area.

Äring och fred.

Håkan

I have stuck this here in case I get accused of fluffy, bunny-hood :D

 

Just a quick, and hopefully not too stupid a question, but something that's been bothering me more and more the closer we get - do heathens celebrate Winter Nights on the 1st full moon following the autumn equinox or do you celebrate on Oct 31st/Hallow's Eve?

 

I have found examples of both from Heathen, Anglo-Saxon and Asatru sites and have got rather confused in the process! I'm just trying to find out as I am interested in comparing how the heathen and non-heathen seasonal cycles compare.

 

Dazed & confused,

:D

28521[/snapback]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hi.

Me and my friends,as well as most swedish heathens,celebrate Jul at the winter solice.Since we don´t know the exact date for ancient times,it´s a good time to do it.Here in Sweden,were Alvablot it celebrated in autumn,we do that as close as possible to the full-moon in november.And we try to get all blots as close as possible to the full-moon,but from practical reasons chosing the saturday nearest to it.After all,people have families and work they just can´t skip to run off for blots.A compromise for sure,but one that works.

Hope this was to some help.

Äring och fred.

Tjelvar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suppose we could celebrate all fire festivals on the nearest full moon. Samhain presumably would then be the second full moon after the autumn equinox. Imbolc would be the second after Yule, Beltaine the second after spring equinox and Lughnasadh the second after midsummer.

However, if the fire festivals are celebrated roughly halfway between one quarter day and the next, in line with the solar calendar, this makes for extra special days every nineteen years, when the lunar calendar catches up with the solar again.

there is evidence to suggest that neolithic people, for example, recognised this. Nine Stones Close in Derbyshire points towards the rising moon between two outcrops of rock called Robin Hood's Stride at a certain point in it's nineteen year cycle.

I think a fire festival which happens to occur on a full moon (or possibly even a new moon) should be a real time for celebration.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I and all the British Heathens I know celebrate Winternights when the weather changes.

 

There is a good historical reason for both doing this, and (from Scandinavian texts) to celebrate it on a given date, but the common Heathen practice is either (more commonly) as I've described or (less commonly, to fit in with other pagans) to celebrate on 31st October.

 

Because we wait for the weather to change Winternights can be celebrated on different nights in different parts of the country. This year, I went to two Winternights blots on successive weekend in mid-October, and had an invite for a third on an entirely different weekend.

 

I don't know of any generally accepted Heathen festivals (as practised in Britain) which are tied to the full moon, though I know of one Heathen who celebrates one festival to her patron according to that method. Technically, according to the Scandinavian references, Winternights would be celebrated on the first day of winter i.e. on the day following the first night of the month Winterfylleth (that's the anglo Saxon name for the month, as I'm not familiar with the Norse names).

 

The ancient Heathens ran a lunar calendar, which meant that each month began as soon as a moon was seen in the sky after the period of no moon (i.e. what we call new moon). So the first time one saw a sliver of a crescent of the new moon was when the month began - hence the following day in the month of Winterfylleth was the first day of winter. Full moons, of course, occur halfway through the month and are largely irrelevant. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because we wait for the weather to change Winternights can be celebrated on different nights in different parts of the country. This year, I went to two Winternights blots on successive weekend in mid-October, and had an invite for a third on an entirely different weekend.

 

 

61086[/snapback]

 

Well I've always known that Heathens liked a good party :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I celebrate Ancestors Night on the first Saturday in November. This is based on English folklore and honouring the ancestors.

 

I associate Winter Nights with blood sacrifice at the beginning of winter - I don't do that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Moonsmith
      I’ve posted a link (in links) to a BBC article in today’s news just to illustrate a bit of the colourful side of Paganism.  Perhaps it will do something to balance my prosaic take on the subject. i know little of Witchcraft but I enjoyed the article and like her approach.  
    • Ellinas
      👍 It's as good a position as any and better than quite a few.  
    • Stonehugger
      Yes, it was in Nettle's "Who are your deities?" thread. I said "I seem to have become an atheist. That was never my plan, but here I am." Veggiedancer later said it better than me - "I don’t exactly believe in deities as such. I think they come from  our minds. Archetypes, ways of identify or characterising the spirit/ magic/ life or whatever it is we sense around us. Ways our minds try to explain the unexplainable to us???"
    • Moonsmith
      I’m probably second guessing Nettle wrongly but it wasn’t all that long ago that you would have read posts about alters, magic, Shamanism, spells etc. I think it was either Teatimetreat or Drachenfach that had a hex on her handbag and her car.  When the car was stolen it crashed and the thief was caught. I agree and would very much like to see more of the colourful side of Paganism back here.  Quite right Ellinas.  I do not understand how anyone can claim to be Pantheist (or even pantheist) and atheist at the same time even though the most prominent Pantheists do exactly that.  As I’ve said elsewhere: why can’t they call themselves Panists.  The prefix “pan” means everything and everywhere as in “pandemic”.  The god’s name arose from the adjective so it wouldn’t necessarily mean a devotee of Pan. pee ess - it may be worth mentioning that there are a vast number of belief groups under the umbrella word Paganism.  Druids Witches, Polytheist and Shaman are only a small part of what the greater picture of Paganism depicts. Dunno and don’t care are probably the biggest groups.
    • Ellinas
      All the above, plus the impression of a preponderance of atheism is currently, as well as historically, inaccurate.  Certainly, I am no atheist.  I believe MS rejects the term as applicable to himself.  Stonehugger, I think, recently said he had headed in that direction, but I've not seen the other resident atheists for a while. However, our ideas of deity are not the same, necessarily.
×
×
  • Create New...