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Help Books - books to read


Guest sifish
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hi i have deen looking into it a bit more for my own peace of mind and from what i have read on here i need to learn more can any one tell me a good book that i can get to tell me more as it is a bit hard to find some think i now know is me but do not know how to be if you get my drift :o_hail:

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Hi Sithis

 

If there's something that interests you in particular, then I have included the following link to a UKP thread, where you will find a list of good suggestions for recommended reading:

 

http://thevalley.ukpagan.com/index.php?showtopic=22577

 

You'll probably need more than one book to start you off, and if you know roughly what may interest you, that'll help narrow down what to choose.

Oh, and stay away from "How to.." Books :o_hail:

 

Good luck :lol:

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Hi Sifish - I've moved this topic to Starters Orders, as it's not really a new member's intro, but a request for information. :o_hail:

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  • 3 weeks later...

if you are looking for info on different paths i can reccomend Pete Jennings Pagan Paths,its a really good no nonsence straight forward guide,i have also bought some of the books that arte on the reccomended thread and they have also been very good :)

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I have yet to get around to reading Pagan Paths by Pete Jennings but from what I have read about the book it sounds as though it would make a good introduction to a number of Pagan paths.

 

I think key to understanding modern Paganism is to know something of its history and to this end there is one name that stands out: Ronald Hutton. The Books are:

 

The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles: Their Nature and Legacy, The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain, The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft, Shamans: Siberian Spirituality and the Western Imagination, Witches, Druids and King Arthur, and The Druids.

 

Finally I would recommend The Way of Wyrd by Brian Bates.

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hmm yes i forgot about Ronald Hutton,i did read Stations Of The Sun and Triumph Of The Moon, i would like to read The Druids next but will have to wait until i can afford it,i got the others from the library but i havent seen this there,i think its too new to be honest,im looking forward to reading it though,not being academically minded i did struggle a bit with them and had to reread bits over and over ,but well worht reading i would say :)

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‘Well worth reading’ is a bit of an understatement if you ask me, ‘compulsory reading on pain of death’ is more appropriate :D .

 

I would suggest reading ‘Witches, Druids and King Arthur’ before ‘The Druids’ , in the last chapter ‘Living With Witchcraft’ he writes about some of his experiences researching Triumph of the Moon and the responses to it (the main focus of the chapter is reactivity and reflexivity) “I intended to include a relatively long section reflecting on those issues. I drafted this, and then, after some thought, excised it… I found much of what I had to write too painful and personal for publication.”.

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Ronald Hutton is my absolute hero. ;)

 

It would not be an understatement to say that he is responsible for me taking up my path. "Triumph of the Moon" was an absolute revelation to me. It disabused me of all my fluff :D and cleared the way for some serious study and the acceptance of what was happening to me spiritually. I've since read everything he's written and have bought all his Pagany type books. If there was one person I could meet and shake the hand of it would be him. :(

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‘Well worth reading’ is a bit of an understatement if you ask me, ‘compulsory reading on pain of death’ is more appropriate :D .

 

I would suggest reading ‘Witches, Druids and King Arthur’ before ‘The Druids’ , in the last chapter ‘Living With Witchcraft’ he writes about some of his experiences researching Triumph of the Moon and the responses to it (the main focus of the chapter is reactivity and reflexivity) “I intended to include a relatively long section reflecting on those issues. I drafted this, and then, after some thought, excised it… I found much of what I had to write too painful and personal for publication.”.

269427[/snapback]

 

 

thats me queen of the understatement :( ,i agree they are compulsory really ,thanks for the tip i will read the other first then :P

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Ronald Hutton is my absolute hero. :D

 

It would not be an understatement to say that he is responsible for me taking up my path. "Triumph of the Moon" was an absolute revelation to me. It disabused me of all my fluff  :( and cleared the way for some serious study and the acceptance of what was happening to me spiritually. I've since read everything he's written and have bought all his Pagany type books. If there was one person I could meet and shake the hand of it would be him.  :D

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i did enjoy reading his books and like you say they knock the fluffy bits off,i did have to reread some bits several times as i wasnt at the front of the queue when the brains were handed out :P but i got there in the end,like i say i did borrow them from the library,but i fully intened to buy my own copies at some point in the not too distant future hopefully,then i can read them again ,i think i will get more out of them now its a few months down the line :)

 

edited to ask is The Way Of Wyrd by Brian Bates widely available,i tried to buy it online last year and i couodnt get hold of it

Edited by morbidia
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Yep they have it at Amazon now:

 

Way of Wyrd

 

It's an enjoyable read  :D

269731[/snapback]

 

oh nooo you enticed me onto Amazon,i can feel my credit card trembling in my purse :( i have added it to my wish list ,they are selling it along with another of his books (The Real Middle Earth) as a special offer,have you read that one and if so is it any good,i usually try to buy enough to get free delivery ,well thats my excuse anyway :P

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Nothing to suggest that hasn't already been suggested, but for cheaper books online with free delivery try "The Book Depository.co.uk" or "play.com"

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Nothing to suggest that hasn't already been suggested, but for cheaper books online with free delivery try "The Book Depository.co.uk" or "play.com"

269772[/snapback]

 

thanks for this,i didnt realise that play.com did books or that it was free delivery,i will check it out cheers :)

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I also found this site a while ago, you can also download lots of books here for free:

 

 

SCRIBD

269777[/snapback]

 

thanks for the link i have added it to my favourite list so i can go back and have a proper look :)

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have you read that one and if so is it any good,

 

No - haven't read it yet but would be interested to. Let us know what it's like if you get it :)

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have you read that one and if so is it any good,

 

No - haven't read it yet but would be interested to. Let us know what it's like if you get it :)

269842[/snapback]

 

i will, its payday next week and i allow myself one order of books per paycheck so i think those two will be this months choice,it will be a little while before i read it though as i have a pile i am working my way through :D

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