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Celtic Pagan's - ANy around in here???


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Hiya!

 

Just wondered if there are any Celtic Pagans or Druids around on here?? If you are, what form does that take for you?

 

DO you se druidry and celtic paganism as two different things? What gods etc do you worship or venerate?

 

OK, ok, lots of questions!!! Just looking to get into discussion as IM very interested in this area myself but am just feeling my at presenht.

 

 

Tree xx

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Not Druidry as such (for reasons that would cause mayhem here!) but yes, certainly interested in all things "Celtic".

 

Is there anything in particular that interests you?

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Just realised you did ask specifics! (:D Me fick.)

 

Deities to whom I am drawn: The Morrigan, the Cailleach, Bran, Lugh.

 

Unfortunately, there's a lot of misinformation about what is Celtic, and what the Druids did. There is no actuall evidence of ancient practices (in writing) but much second hand observation, written in the main by the victors.

 

Much can also be deduced from reading the poems of the period, and disentangling the myths and songs, plus symbology.

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The difference between the two is that druidry is a specific path that was made up a couple of hundred years ago as a reconstruction of something that disappeared a couple of thousand years ago and celtic paganism covers a diverse variety of paths that are based on all kinds of Welsh, Scots and Irish "stuff". I belong to the second lot :P .

I belong to the Welsh gods (they got to me first :) ) but which one I'm drawn to depends on what I'm up to at the time.

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Just wondered if there are any Celtic Pagans or Druids around on here?? If you are, what form does that take for you?

 

I'm one. Lean towards the heavier end but I'd probably line up with the CT school rather than the strict reconstructionists.

 

DO you se druidry and celtic paganism as two different things? What gods etc do you worship or venerate?

 

Tend to give druidry a nod rather than describing myself as one - I'm more into the "everyday life" kind of Paganism, the sort of way the common people would have expressed things rather than the scholarly sort.

 

"I swear by the gods of my tribe..." (though once again on a day to day basis I'm more likely to venerate the small spirits of place rather than looking for a higher deity)

 

gwyn eich byd

 

Ffred

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Hiya!

 

Just wondered if there are any Celtic Pagans or Druids around on here?? If you are, what form does that take for you?

 

DO you se druidry and celtic paganism as two different things? What gods etc do you worship or venerate?

 

OK, ok, lots of questions!!! Just looking to get into discussion as IM very interested in this area myself but am just feeling my at presenht.

 

 

Tree xx

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I generally identify as a Celtic Reconstructionist. I tend to honour the gods in general, but I feel I have a closer relationship with some more than others. These include Badb, Manannan, the Dagda and the Cailleach, but since I live on the Clyde I also honour Clota (who may or may not be a deity...but whoever I've been talking to doesn't seem to mind). I also honour the spirits of the place, and my ancestors.

 

I see druidry as being a lot different from what I do; I tend to focus on a more personal, hearthy sort of practice. I've looked into modern druidry and it's just not me.

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im looking into druidry at the moment but im godless so i dont know how that will work,i acknowledge the spirit of the place rather than gods/godesses,i am at the begginning though so im not to versed in the ins and outs,im hoping to find out more this year :)

Edited by morbidia
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I am an Ovate in the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids but I am primarily interested in neo-Druidry rather than Celtic Reconstructionism. Druidry is a very broad term which can encompass anything from Christians worshipping in a Celtic mode to hard polytheist pagans, wiccan Druids (Druidcraft) and Heathen Druids. The Celtic Reconstructionists tend to be fairly hostile to neo-Druidry in its most popularist forms and there seems to be less and less common ground between the two these days. For me, neo-Druidry is more of a philosophy, my religious practices are Roman Recon and Anglican Christian.

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Lots to ponder here. Was wondering if you could (maybe Tas here and Seren) direct me to more Scottish/Irish Gods etc as feel thats where my ancestry lies and where I'm being pulled.

 

I do tend to be more down to earth and hearthy, but feel Id like to learn more about the bigger picture so to speak, of country and ancestry.

 

tree

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I'll ad my name to the roll call :) . I wouldn't exactly call myself a druid though I wouldn't say I wasn't either. I haven't made my mind up on that one. I lean more to the celtic reconstructionist side of things but not to the hard line. I'm more drawn to the cots/Irish rather then the Welsh. All in all, I just go with whats right for me and try not to box myself in. I'm like Badger Bob in that druidry is more of a philosophy for me but Celtic Recon defines my religious beliefs. I am also an OBOD member too. Unfortunately the two seem occasionally seem to jar badly with each. Its just patience and working things out till they flow, discarding stuff in the process.

 

Defining druidry is always a hard thing at there are some many variations. You only have to look at the various approaches of the different orders.

 

What sort of information would you like? I can give you links galore to look at.

 

If you are interested in the history of modern druidry, I can dig up the links to a couple of podcasts featuring Professor Ronald Hutton lecturing about history of modern druidry and a pdf of a paper he presented. It's the basis of his book on Druids. However it doesn't really clear up the different current definitions of druidry, but more explains where modern druidry started.

 

The Irish Gods is a list and half.

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I am an Ovate in the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids but I am primarily interested in neo-Druidry rather than Celtic Reconstructionism. Druidry is a very broad term which can encompass anything from Christians worshipping in a Celtic mode to hard polytheist pagans, wiccan Druids (Druidcraft) and Heathen Druids. The Celtic Reconstructionists tend to be fairly hostile to neo-Druidry in its most popularist forms and there seems to be less and less common ground between the two these days. For me, neo-Druidry is more of a philosophy, my religious practices are Roman Recon and Anglican Christian.

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hi Bob im wondering could you elaborate for me what you mean by neo druidry ,i have just read a book called The Path Through The Forest it focused on druidry from a strictly celtic view, i am now reading a Cassandra Easson book called Pagan In The City,this seems to be coming from a different angle and she mentions neo druidry in the book,im confused .com :)

also im also not sure about gods/godesses,im interested in a few but im not sure im drawn to anyone and definitly dont have any experience of being nudged as some people do

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Just wondered if there are any Celtic Pagans or Druids around on here?? If you are, what form does that take for you?

 

I'm one. Lean towards the heavier end but I'd probably line up with the CT school rather than the strict reconstructionists.

 

DO you se druidry and celtic paganism as two different things? What gods etc do you worship or venerate?

 

Tend to give druidry a nod rather than describing myself as one - I'm more into the "everyday life" kind of Paganism, the sort of way the common people would have expressed things rather than the scholarly sort.

 

"I swear by the gods of my tribe..." (though once again on a day to day basis I'm more likely to venerate the small spirits of place rather than looking for a higher deity)

 

gwyn eich byd

 

Ffred

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hmmm this best describes how i see my way of doing things ,more as a practical day to day paganism instead of a scholarly way,i honour the spirit of nature and the spirits of the place :)

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hi Bob im wondering could you elaborate for me what you mean by neo druidry ,i have just read a book called The Path Through The Forest it focused on druidry from a strictly celtic view, i am now  reading a Cassandra Easson book called Pagan In The City,this seems to be coming from a different angle and she mentions neo druidry in the book,im confused .com :)

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Well basically any Druidry that is based on the Druidic revival of the eighteenth century is neo-druidry. The Path Through the Forest describes a form of neo-druidry, it is based on Celtic myth and legend but it is modern (well a couple of hundred years in development) in its ethos. Things like circles, calling the quarters etc. are trappings of modern neo-Druidry. Bonewits divides Druidry into three phases: Paleo-Pagan Druidry which is the lost ancient practice, Meso-Pagan Druidry which is the early revivalist form, sometimes monotheist but having Christian overtones even in polytheist forms and Neo-Pagan Druidry which is generally polytheist. He classifies them here Defining Paganism but Neo-Druidry is often used to refer to the various forms of Meso-Pagan, Christo-Pagan and Neo-Pagan Druidry in order to distinguish it from the ancient Druidry now lost to us (mainly to assuage the kind of person who is just waiting to accuse (neo)Druids of claiming modern practices as ancient). I am firmly Meso-Pagan with some Christo-Pagan sympathies for the record.

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so what does Recon refer to? (he says being an Ovate with OBOD - probably should know!)

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Recon or reconstructionism refers to paths that seek to put paganism on a more historically accurate footing. Recons generally build their path from the ground up, taking only those practices that are attested in the archaeological record or contemporary literature. Interpretive work is generally frowned upon and kept to the absolute minimum in order to create a useable framework. As a Roman recon we have it fairly easy as there is a heck of a lot of literature and reams of archaeology out there but even so it is difficult to put it all together into an intelligible practice. My hat is off to Celtic recons, they don't half have their work cut out.

 

hat is OBOD then?

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OBOD (The Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids) is a fairly broad church with Christo-Pagans, Meso-Pagans, Neo-Pagans and a very few Recons. Its origins are Meso-Pagan as it is an offshoot of the Ancient Order of Druids from which it split in the 60s to follow an increasingly Neo-Pagan path.

 

Unless you meant which hat is OBOD, in which case I would have to say that it is a bowler hat with antlers stuck on... :D

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I joined OBOD about 15 years ago and its a good group, nice social scene with camps and conferences and local groves, generally very nice people and a course which gives people a good grounding in a fairly non-specific more or less Celtic almost paganism... OBOD seems to manage to juggle Christians, Pagans and all sorts of others in its membership without alienating anyone too severely.

 

One of its strengths is that it will give you a good grounding and if you are attracted to another more strongly flavoured sort of Paganism later then you will have had experience of a positive group to judge it by.

 

I left OBOD for a long time and was initiated as a Wiccan, then got more interested in Shamanic stuff and would lately describe myself as an Animist, with increasingly less interest in Gods and magick and trance etc etc and more interest in moss and ethics and bugs and gardening...

 

Recently though, maybe three years ago I got back into contact with OBOD via Damh the Bard's camp and I feel as if I never left. OBOD is vague enough I don't feel like I'm being asked to believe seven impossible things before breakfast, and it attracts really nice people. :D

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I'm an Irish polytheist. I don't personally think anyone can properly call themselves a Druid nowadays, and I don't rateneo-druidry, but the Druids and the bits we know about them can be very helpful in informing yourself about the celtic period and pagan beliefs in celtic areas. I personally have an interest in some gods more than others but in general i honour the gods of my land and heritage, and i try to understand those gods as they are not as I would like them to be.

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hi Bob im wondering could you elaborate for me what you mean by neo druidry ,i have just read a book called The Path Through The Forest it focused on druidry from a strictly celtic view, i am now  reading a Cassandra Easson book called Pagan In The City,this seems to be coming from a different angle and she mentions neo druidry in the book,im confused .com :D

278255[/snapback]

 

Well basically any Druidry that is based on the Druidic revival of the eighteenth century is neo-druidry. The Path Through the Forest describes a form of neo-druidry, it is based on Celtic myth and legend but it is modern (well a couple of hundred years in development) in its ethos. Things like circles, calling the quarters etc. are trappings of modern neo-Druidry. Bonewits divides Druidry into three phases: Paleo-Pagan Druidry which is the lost ancient practice, Meso-Pagan Druidry which is the early revivalist form, sometimes monotheist but having Christian overtones even in polytheist forms and Neo-Pagan Druidry which is generally polytheist. He classifies them here Defining Paganism but Neo-Druidry is often used to refer to the various forms of Meso-Pagan, Christo-Pagan and Neo-Pagan Druidry in order to distinguish it from the ancient Druidry now lost to us (mainly to assuage the kind of person who is just waiting to accuse (neo)Druids of claiming modern practices as ancient). I am firmly Meso-Pagan with some Christo-Pagan sympathies for the record.

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hi Bob thanks for the reply and the explanation ,it is all becoming clear to me now...lol.... i still havent made my mind uo what i am though ,i think it might take a while :lol:

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I joined OBOD about 15 years ago and its a good group, nice social scene with camps and conferences and local groves, generally very nice people and a course which gives people a good grounding in a fairly non-specific more or less Celtic almost paganism...  OBOD seems to manage to juggle Christians, Pagans and all sorts of others in its membership without alienating anyone too severely.

 

One of its strengths is that it will give you a good grounding and if you are attracted to another more strongly flavoured sort of Paganism later then you will have had experience of a positive group to judge it by.

 

I left OBOD for a long time and was initiated as a Wiccan, then got more interested in Shamanic stuff and would lately describe myself as an Animist, with increasingly less interest in Gods and magick and trance etc etc and more interest in moss and ethics and bugs and gardening...

 

Recently though, maybe three years ago I got back into contact with OBOD via Damh the Bard's camp and I feel as if I never left. OBOD is vague enough I don't feel like I'm being asked to believe seven impossible things before breakfast, and it attracts really nice people. :D

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hi Corwen ,i am a member of the OBOD site but under a different name, your right it is a good site for finding really good info and its friendly too which i like,i have considered doing the course but cant contemplate it for a few months because im doing an NVQ for work which is taking up lots of time and i need to save up for it too :lol: ,do you use the same name there because i thought i recognised you :) i have seen Badger Bobs name over there too :)

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you could call me a celtic pagan but tecnically im not, im more interested in what was before the celts. i am a devotee of the god commonly known as Cernunnos but i call him Cerne and i believe he originates from before the celtic culture. so far he is the only deity that has called to me altho recently a goddess of the primal waters has been whispering to me from a distance. my beliefes and practices are centered on nature and the environment... infact my whole life revolves around them. as much as i respect the druids i couldnt be one... far too organised! i prefer my beliefes to be much more free form.

SV xXx

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as much as i respect the druids i couldnt be one... far too organised!

278754[/snapback]

 

I'm guessing you have not met many Druids :o_bounce3:

 

Now let's see... pissup - brewery - help!

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I'm an Irish polytheist. I don't personally think anyone can properly call themselves a Druid nowadays, and I don't rateneo-druidry, but the Druids and the bits we know about them can be very helpful in informing yourself about the celtic period and pagan beliefs in celtic areas. I personally have an interest in some gods more than others but in general i honour the gods of my land and heritage, and i try to understand those gods as they are not as I would like them to be.

278331[/snapback]

 

 

hi Bob im wondering could you elaborate for me what you mean by neo druidry ,i have just read a book called The Path Through The Forest it focused on druidry from a strictly celtic view, i am now  reading a Cassandra Easson book called Pagan In The City,this seems to be coming from a different angle and she mentions neo druidry in the book,im confused .com :D

278255[/snapback]

 

Well basically any Druidry that is based on the Druidic revival of the eighteenth century is neo-druidry. The Path Through the Forest describes a form of neo-druidry, it is based on Celtic myth and legend but it is modern (well a couple of hundred years in development) in its ethos. Things like circles, calling the quarters etc. are trappings of modern neo-Druidry. Bonewits divides Druidry into three phases: Paleo-Pagan Druidry which is the lost ancient practice, Meso-Pagan Druidry which is the early revivalist form, sometimes monotheist but having Christian overtones even in polytheist forms and Neo-Pagan Druidry which is generally polytheist. He classifies them here Defining Paganism but Neo-Druidry is often used to refer to the various forms of Meso-Pagan, Christo-Pagan and Neo-Pagan Druidry in order to distinguish it from the ancient Druidry now lost to us (mainly to assuage the kind of person who is just waiting to accuse (neo)Druids of claiming modern practices as ancient). I am firmly Meso-Pagan with some Christo-Pagan sympathies for the record.

278289[/snapback]

hi Bob thanks for the reply and the explanation ,it is all becoming clear to me now...lol.... i still havent made my mind uo what i am though ,i think it might take a while :angry:

278546[/snapback]

I'm an Irish polytheist. I don't personally think anyone can properly call themselves a Druid nowadays, and I don't rateneo-druidry, but the Druids and the bits we know about them can be very helpful in informing yourself about the celtic period and pagan beliefs in celtic areas. I personally have an interest in some gods more than others but in general i honour the gods of my land and heritage, and i try to understand those gods as they are not as I would like them to be.

278331[/snapback]

 

Neo Druidry is very varied and OBOD encompasses people from the very New Age to serious scholarly reconstructionists, and everyone inbetween.

 

Anyone can (and does) call themselves a Druid these days, that's just a fact of life. No-one would pretend that they are the same as the Druids of old, but Druidry as it is practised today is a new thing, inspired by but not identical to or continuous with ancient Druidry. Sorry you have a problem with that. At least someone who has been through the OBOD course (or been trained by one of the other Orders) has had a reasonable grounding in a nature based spiritual practice. Anyway this question has been exhaustively covered elsewhere!

 

Morbidia, yes I am on the OBOD forum with the same name. I use this name everywhere, its my name! The course can take a lot of time, but you can take as long over it as you like too. I have been in the Ovate grade for 13 years...

 

What is your name on that forum, if you don't mind me asking?

 

Badger Bob, thats funny! :)

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as much as i respect the druids i couldnt be one... far too organised!

278754[/snapback]

 

I'm guessing you have not met many Druids ;)

 

Now let's see... pissup - brewery - help!

278886[/snapback]

 

lol... i mean't the belief structure etc... im jus 2 much of a free spirit...

SV xXx

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Hi, I am also an OBOD member but not necessarily drawn to things celtic (I have been at times in my life but nothing particularly has cone of it since I re-found paganism), I am half way through the Bardic course (Eagle you must have gone a lot faster than me!!) and have found it a useful grounding and the experiential stuff has been really helpful to me. The rituals and suchlike aren't so me although I do enjoy the group I attend (though most of them there are pretty new-agey). I have used less formal version of rituals for a couple of things and they have been really special for me.

 

Gods and goddesses.... still keeping my eyes and ears open, but not sure I've come across any yet other than one, who doesn't fit in anywhere at all with my path so far, but maybe that doesn't matter as long as we're both happy with it :ph34r: .

 

I guess when people think of druids they just think of the big organised rituals with everyone in white robes etc, but my experience of it so far isn't really anything like that.

 

If you want to learn about druidry along the lines of what OBOD does, Philip Carr-Gomm's Druid Mysteries is pretty good and a nice read.

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