Jump to content
Galaemar Laerareon

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

Starting Points - Some stepping stones


Guest Lorelei
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

So as the title implies I'm fairly new to this...although I have been interested in paganism in a very general sense on and off for the last 6 years or so now and I know feel in a position where I have the time and ability to dedicate to exploring this more and finding my own path.

 

At the moment I'm just about to start some general reading on paths in the form of Peter Jennings's book on the subject, but I would be grateful of any recommendations for other general books on paganism, especially ones that give a good overview of the pagan calendar and festivals.

 

In addition to this reading, I've done a little bit of online exploration and so far there are 3 things that have struck a cord in me that I could do with some help one. They are: the celtic tradition, hedge witchcraft and tarot. All of them fall into that category of things that strike a cord that never stops resonating but that I have no idea with where to go to take the next step. Any recommendations of literature on these topics.....or anything else really would be brilliant.

 

Thanks all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

For General Hedge Witchery, A Witch Alone, by Marian Green.

 

For Celtic Tradition The Celtic Seers Sourcebook, by John Matthews.

You might like to read Gods and Fighting Men (translated) by Lady Gregory

for the Irish Myths.

There are various translations of the Mabinogion if you want the Brythonic myths, and Mammoth (imprint) do a nice collection of Celtic myths from various sources.

 

For Tarot my personal recommendation is Dancing with the Juggler by Carolynn Townsend.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Fred-in-the-Green,

 

Thanks for the reply and for the recommendations.

 

Can you recommend any particular edition of the translated Mabinogoin or are the all much of a much-ness when translated?

 

Also in terms of the hedge witchery, someone else has recommended Rae Beth's Hedge Witch: A Guide To Solitary Witchcraft - is it actually any good?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also in terms of the hedge witchery, someone else has recommended Rae Beth's Hedge Witch: A Guide To Solitary Witchcraft - is it actually any good?

322198[/snapback]

 

It's not at all bad. Seemed to be very based in visualisation and trance work though, although it does have an overview of some festivals as you say you'd like. I read it a while ago at the same time as I was reading another of her books so they've kind of mixed in my head and I'm not sure if the one you mention is the one I'm talking about now! But they are very easy reads and good to be dipped into. Maybe sometimes a little on the twee side, but generally sound.

 

Although there's bound to be someone popping up telling you not to bother because she's terrible, that's what we're like here :unsure: . I'd say give her a go (your local library might have one of her books actually, mine does).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horrible book.

 

 

Nah, only kidding.

I don't like books on spirituality but this one is the only one i actually liked. It gives all the festivals, meanings for each and covers most of the basic stuff you seem to want in a non-pretentious easy to read style.

Nice lady, nice book. But as pen says, a bit twee in parts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Fred-in-the-Green,

 

Thanks for the reply and for the recommendations.

 

Can you recommend any particular edition of the translated Mabinogoin or are the all much of a much-ness when translated?

 

Also in terms of the hedge witchery, someone else has recommended Rae Beth's Hedge Witch: A Guide To Solitary Witchcraft - is it actually any good?

322198[/snapback]

 

 

Rae Beth is great fun. But even if she wasn't, you should read her and make up your own mind.

 

Mabinogions much of a muchness? On the contrary, they vary widely/wildly in terms of the language they are presented in. Some are teeth-clenchingly archaic. Some are bland, some are arch and patronising. Get hold of some and try the prose. If you find one you can stand, take it. IMO, some are intolerable.

I'm not a good person to ask about the Brythonic tales. The Goedelic ones resonate with me and stay in my mind. The Brythonic ones drift away like conversations overheard at a bus-stop.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would suggest you read anything and everything you can get your hands on. Don't worry if it gets bad reviews, don't worry if its labeled "fluffy crap", read it.

 

I've done my fair share of reading rubbish as I tried to find my way and I think it actually stands you in good stead. It gives you perspective. It also lets you see that you probably know more than you think because you'll find yourself thinking things like "that doesn't make sense" or "thats nonsense" or even "ooh now THAT connects with me" :)

 

It also allows you later on to filter and connect dots. My suggestion would be to go and have a look in the Bookworms. Go back over old threads where you will see books recommended for lots of things, oh.. and that is one more point actually.. there is not one book for one thing. Most of us have pulled knowledge together from many sources and it gives a far more rounded knowledge and understanding of the subject.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definitely what Xalle says. I would also suggest you take the history often stated in beginner books with a pinch of salt. There's a bit of romantisim going on with pagan history, particularly the "Burning Times" and matriarchial societies.

 

And remember correspondences really do depend on your experiences, so take those lists as a starting point and build up your own over time.

 

Joxy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you recommend any particular edition of the translated Mabinogoin or are the all much of a much-ness when translated?

 

 

My own favourites are the Gwyn and Thomas Jones version (in English) and the Rhiannon Ifans version (in Welsh)

 

If you're interested in Celtic issues then engaging with at least one of the languages will raise its head at some point...

 

gwyn eich byd

 

Ffred

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My own favourites are the Gwyn and Thomas Jones version (in English) and the Rhiannon Ifans version (in Welsh)

 

If you're interested in Celtic issues then engaging with at least one of the languages will raise its head at some point...

 

gwyn eich byd

 

Ffred

322252[/snapback]

 

Just to come back to this, I invested in the Sinead Davis version of the Mabinogion today which looks like a pretty good copy. I may invest in at least one of the others you mentioned here at a later date.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the Gwyn and Thomas Jones translation. I can't read Welsh so I can't comment from that perspective, but my friend who is Welsh and speaks and reads Welsh, speaks very highly of the Sioned Davies version.

 

Frey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the pagan calendar and festivals
Which pagan calendar and festivals? :D

 

There's a THE calendar?

 

(I bet it's those Wiccans :P )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the pagan calendar and festivals
Which pagan calendar and festivals? :D

 

There's a THE calendar?

 

(I bet it's those Wiccans :P )

322924[/snapback]

 

I should've said the Celtic Wheel of the Year and it's festivals I guess, so bad semantics on my part I guess. Apologies for that....please don't ninja me to death just yet? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Moonsmith
      I’ve posted a link (in links) to a BBC article in today’s news just to illustrate a bit of the colourful side of Paganism.  Perhaps it will do something to balance my prosaic take on the subject. i know little of Witchcraft but I enjoyed the article and like her approach.  
    • Ellinas
      👍 It's as good a position as any and better than quite a few.  
    • Stonehugger
      Yes, it was in Nettle's "Who are your deities?" thread. I said "I seem to have become an atheist. That was never my plan, but here I am." Veggiedancer later said it better than me - "I don’t exactly believe in deities as such. I think they come from  our minds. Archetypes, ways of identify or characterising the spirit/ magic/ life or whatever it is we sense around us. Ways our minds try to explain the unexplainable to us???"
    • Moonsmith
      I’m probably second guessing Nettle wrongly but it wasn’t all that long ago that you would have read posts about alters, magic, Shamanism, spells etc. I think it was either Teatimetreat or Drachenfach that had a hex on her handbag and her car.  When the car was stolen it crashed and the thief was caught. I agree and would very much like to see more of the colourful side of Paganism back here.  Quite right Ellinas.  I do not understand how anyone can claim to be Pantheist (or even pantheist) and atheist at the same time even though the most prominent Pantheists do exactly that.  As I’ve said elsewhere: why can’t they call themselves Panists.  The prefix “pan” means everything and everywhere as in “pandemic”.  The god’s name arose from the adjective so it wouldn’t necessarily mean a devotee of Pan. pee ess - it may be worth mentioning that there are a vast number of belief groups under the umbrella word Paganism.  Druids Witches, Polytheist and Shaman are only a small part of what the greater picture of Paganism depicts. Dunno and don’t care are probably the biggest groups.
    • Ellinas
      All the above, plus the impression of a preponderance of atheism is currently, as well as historically, inaccurate.  Certainly, I am no atheist.  I believe MS rejects the term as applicable to himself.  Stonehugger, I think, recently said he had headed in that direction, but I've not seen the other resident atheists for a while. However, our ideas of deity are not the same, necessarily.
×
×
  • Create New...