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Heathen Yule Practices


Guest Sigridr
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ive been doing my reading like a good lil heathen gal, and i have a few questions.

 

im planning on doing my first proper blot on during yule, and i understand everything but does one need to do a faining before the blot begins, as the two seem quite similar, with the prayers and such (im reading exploring the northern tradition by galina krasskova, that might explain where im coming from a bit) but the way it is written makes it seem like i do a ritual, then another ritual. im pretty much solitary in this as well, so having to change things to suit my lonesomeness. if another more knowledgeable heathen could pm me with some tips or even post here i would be very greatful.... who knows, maybe reading serious things after a large cup of mulled wine wasn't my best plan

 

a very warm and cheery sigridr xxx

 

 

ooh and i finally found mead!

Edited by Sigridr
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What in the Nine Worlds is a faining? :o_cuddle: I've been to private blots and never come across the word.

 

I can only tell you the practices I've come across. In the hearth I attended we stood in a circle, if the blot was outside, or sat around the room, if inside. We'd make offerings - usually food or drink, but it could be anything. We'd hold a sumble. The blot proper might (probably would) include a short prayer to the god the offerings were made to. The sumble was generally quite long (sometimes six or more rounds).

 

Now, that's the very basic sketch, but there are loads of variations. For example, if it were a blot to Ran I'd expect to do it by the sea, and perhaps collect items for my altar. I've been part of a public blot to Saga which involved acting out a tale from the Eddas. A blot to Hretha included some weaving.

 

Really, it can be as complicated or as simple as you want. :o_cuddle:

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Faining is a modern rendering of the Old English word fægn, and simply meant rejoicing or being glad.

 

It's another example of people jumping on a bandwagon, making things up and claiming historical authenticity for them.

 

--

 

If you are on your own for the whole twelve days, then find someone you love and share hospitality with them - you'll be closer to the heathen practices of your ancestors doing that than following any ritual from a book. And go and look at the thread on Yule celebrations elsewhere on the site, or look at the threads on the BBC religion boards and join in the discussions there.

 

--

 

Here's the relevant parts of the Bosworth Toller dictionary (which is downloadable and online) about the words related to 'fain'.

 

--

 

FÆGEN, fægn; comp. fægenra; sup. fægnost; adj. FAIN, glad, joyful, rejoicing, elate; lætus, gaudens, hĭlăris, elātus :-- Fægen fylle joyful in slaughter, Exon. 96 a; Th. 357, 27; Pa. 35. Wíta ne sceal tó fægen the sagacious must not be too elate, 77 b; Th. 290, 20; Wand. 68 : Cd. 100; Th. 131, 26; Gen. 2182. Ic bió swíðe fægn [Cott. gefægen] gif ðú me lǽdest ðider ic ðé bidde I shall be very glad if thou leadest me whither I desire thee, Bt. 40, 5 ; Fox 240, 25. He, on ferþe fægn fácnes and searuwa, wælhriów wunode he, rejoicing in his mind in stratagem and frauds, remained a tyrant, Bt. Met. Fox 9, 73; Met. 9. 37. Ferdon forþ ðonon, ferhþum fægne they went forth thence, rejoicing in their minds, Beo. Th. 3270; B. 1633. Wǽron ealle fægen in firnum they were all glad in their sufferings, Cd. 223; Th. 292, 3; Sat. 435 : Andr. Kmbl. 2084; An. 1043. Lyt monna wearþ lange fægen ðæs ðe he óðerne bewrencþ few men rejoice long in what they have got by deceiving others, Prov. Kmbl. 34. Fægenra more joyful, Bt. Met. Fox 12, 24; Met. 12, 12. Fægnost most joyful, Exon. 81 b; Th. 306, 26; Seef. 13. [Piers P. fayn : Chauc. fain, fawe : R. Glouc. fawe, fayn : Laym. fæin, fain : O. Sax. fagan : Icel. feginn.] DER. ge-fægen, on-, wil-.

 

fægen. Add: , fagen glad. (l) absolute :-- Faegen conpos, Wrt. Voc. ii. 104, 73. Fægen voti compos, 124, II. (2) with cause of gladness given, (a) in genitive :-- Hilarius nine underféng, fagen his cymes, Hml. Th. ii. 504, 19. Fægen (fagen, v. l. ) his gecyrrednysse, Hml. S. 26, 133. Fægen wǽron síðes, lungre leórdan, An. 1043. ( B ) in a clause :-- HS wæs fægen 1b hé tó scypum ætfleáh, Chr. 1076; P. 211, 28. Wǽron þá burgware tó þon fægene and tó þon blíðe þæt hié feohtan móston, Ors. 5, 3 ; S. 222, 4. Weaxad hraðe feldes blóst-man, fægen ~)* hí n. ðton, Met. 6, 10. © with pen. of pronoun and clause :-- Lyt monna weorð lange fægen ðæs ðe hé ððerne bewrencð few men are glad for long that they have tricked others. Prov. K. 34. Wǽron ealle þæs fægen þæt Drihten wolde him to helpe hám gesécan, Sae. 435. V. feorh-fægen.

 

fægenian; p. ode; pp. od To rejoice; gaudēre :-- Ceruerus ongan fægenian mid his steorte Cerberus began to wag [rejoice with] his tail, Bt. 35, 6; Fox 168, 17. v. fægnian.

Edited by Jezreell
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  • 5 months later...
Faining is a modern rendering of the Old English word fægn, and simply meant rejoicing or being glad.

 

It's another example of people jumping on a bandwagon, making things up and claiming historical authenticity for them.

 

--

 

If you are on your own for the whole twelve days, then find someone you love and share hospitality with them - you'll be closer to the heathen practices of your ancestors doing that than following any ritual from a book. And go and look at the thread on Yule celebrations elsewhere on the site, or look at the threads on the BBC religion boards and join in the discussions there.

 

--

 

For Yule, or any other get-together, festival or lock-in for that matter, I tend to share food, drink and good times with as many members of my family and friends as possible.

 

I've not yet attended a formal blot (plenty of ritual drinking at home) but I'd love to do so at some point and hope to later this year. I tend to feel a little uncomfortable even with the word 'ritual' - purely because of what it conjures to my mind. I have no problem with others ritualising to their hearts' content - my wiccan friends are at it all the time! But it is not something I feel I need a lot of in my own particular flavour or heathen practice.

 

So, what I am getting at I guess, is, I agree wholeheartedly with the above! :D

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