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Asking The Gods. - do you, should you, how to?


Guest Sigridr
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Although i have deities, i have never really asked them for something, except a little bit of protection for my family from thor during a blot. Im having a tiny little bit of a health problem at the moment (not been to drs as i dont know if its serious or no, it could just be nothing) but i wanted to ask Eir to help me out a little. What do i do, or can i? As i said, ive never really asked for help but i really do need it.

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They know.

 

Just share your problems with them, as if you were speaking to your favourite friend or kindred, and set aside a glass of wine, a mug of beer, a horn of mead, or a share in your pot of tea.

 

And do everything you can for yourself as well - the gods don't seem much inclined to help people who sit back and just wait for them to intervene.

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thankyou so much for the advice. i suppose thats why ive never asked for something. they know. Shall have a good ol natter tonight, when my squeak is in bed :(

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Actually I also bother Gods with my earthly matters quite rarely :) But it's not quite right, we shouldn't be afraid to ask for their help. I think you should really address Eir, or just Frigga. Diana Paxson has described quite a nice blot to honor Frigga. Here is an article and quite a detailed instruction of how to address the Goddess, or Eir in exact. Of course if you've got a broom of birch :) http://www.hrafnar.org/goddesses/frigga.html

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frigga is actually a goddess i feel quite close to, but wasn't exactly clear about her role with general health.

 

i have a cheap broom i bought from a supermarket at halloween unfortunatly i dont think its birch hehe :)

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Well, (actually I learned that from the article :) ) Eir can be seen just as a hypostasis of Frigga and I really quite accept such scenario.

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ive read quite a few articles and they seem to connect quite a lot of goddesses with frigg. , imo i see them all as seperate beings, but in no way would argue the latter either. the great thing being that it is all personal in viewpoints.

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I have been pledged to the Wife of Woden for over three decades. She doesn't expect ritual, no more than a clean kitchen and a good meal set before and shared between yourself and her. She is immensely approachable.

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ive found that too jez. i find myself talking to her when cleaning, running after my wee wildy etc.. i find her very straight forward, and tells you exactly what she thinks!

 

i wear a pendant of her, havent pledged myself to any deity though. i know im not nearly ready enough.

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Jez - you've hit it right on the head - They know [already]!

 

Just be in their presence - give the gift of time and audience - that's the basics.

 

Conversation and offerings are in my mind secondary and probably more to reassure/focus you. - But that's just my view.

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Definitely follow Jez's advice here. There's no need for any crazy rituals - just keep it simple and heartfelt. Just stick to giving a 'gift for a gift' and not asking for things you're not prepared to give a proper gift for.

 

As for Frigga, I'd never really 'gotten' Frigga until relatively recently - was always more of a Freyja's maid but I've learned that as well as a clean house, she really appreciates fiber crafts done in her honour :)

 

There's a book called 'Magic of the Norse Goddesses: Mythology, Ritual, Tranceworking' by a lady called Alice Karlsdottir. It will probably surprise some on here that I have this book and that I'm recommending it because it's not particularly scholarly however it does have a lot of good information about the Asynjur and lots of good suggestions for making your own connections with them. I actually quite like that book, we used it quite a bit when I was in an Asynjur group before going to Korea. :)

 

I hope you find the healing you need Sigridr :)

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i actually saw that book and contemplated getting it. might go and check prices :)

 

on the fiber craft side, i was thinking of doing a sample sort of thing, but with the nine noble virtues on it instead of abcde etc

 

now thinking what an appropriate "gift" would be.

Edited by Sigridr
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now thinking what an appropriate "gift" would be.

349512[/snapback]

 

Ask her. :)

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I'm so not a fan of the NNV :) I think they're ok as guidelines but not the 'ten commandments' some folks take them for. Heathen morality is much more complex than that.

 

Sounds funny but I stitched a key to honour Frigga. Most of my stitchwork represents deities in one way or another and makes up our 'fold away' altar. We're nomadic so statues don't work for us :). However I would stitch whatever inspires you or whatever you feel. A couple of years ago I spent 6 months stitching a piece for Odin that I basically kept seeing in a dream until I'd done it. So don't worry about designs, sooner or later they'll let you know what to do.

 

As for the 'gift', I think it depends on the deity in question. Some seem to be a bit more demanding than others but mostly follow what Jez said. Tea or wine or ale or mead or whatever you'd like to offer can be counted as a 'gift'.

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ok, maybe i'm odd women out here, but I don't think one has to offer a gift.

Just knowing that you love and respect, whoever you worship/ pray to, is enough.

Being grateful.. that would be gift enough , i think.

 

Yes, they know our thoughts, but I don't think theres anything wrong w/ asking for guidance and having conversations, i do it all the time, lol.

 

There are more serious things tho, and then yes, I like to do a bit of ritual , but not always.

 

I talk to myself a lot and just hope someone is listening ;) lol :lol:

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Well the OP asked in the context of the Heathen gods and so the answers she got reflected that. There's a huge tradition of gift giving and 'a gift for a gift' in Northern European traditions.

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Same traditions in southern European pre-Christian practises as well - I'd be surprised if it wasn't pretty universal, the offering of a gift in exchange for help.

 

IME, Hellenic and Roman deities would be pretty unchuffed at being asked to do something specific without the offer of something in return.

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Personally I can't see any deity doing something for free but that's just me. It's always seemed to be a very 'quid pro quo' thing.

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Last December me & my wife were expecting our first child after just moving into a new "family" home and I prayed regularly to Frigga - first for a healthy child and second for a happy home to bring my child to.

 

I did a fair bit of research about Frigga and various prayers. Really none on the internet hit the spot. Especially Paxson's (half way through she's essentially calling the quarters!) so eventually I just prayed and it come naturally.

 

As said above, the Gods already know - and if you treat them with respect and an open heart then in my experience they don't really care too much for lots and lots of ritual.

 

Frigga Allmother

Bearer of wisdom

Bringer of Peace

Keeper of secrets

 

Lend us the wisdom to build ...

our house into a home

our home into a family

our family into one love

 

Frigga Allmother

I welcome you to our home

watch over us

and bless us with your patience

(by Marcus (Copyleft: all wrongs reserved))

 

I'm happy to report Megan was born on the 1st of Jan under a beautiful full (and blue) moon and thus far our house has proven a happy and content one (though one without much sleep).

 

I've given thanks to Frigga for this and I hope she continues to keep an eye on us.

 

Marcus

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That's a lovely prayer to Frigga Marcus :D. I totally agree with you about Paxson's ritual to Frigga, but then again, she is pretty wiccatru anyway.

 

Alice Karlsdottir has quite a good ritual to Frigga if you'd like me to dig it out for you. Your personal stuff is undoubtedly better because it's from you and from the heart but you might find it interesting.

 

Here's a call (usually sung) that I wrote to Frigga a while back. People have commented on the 'your agony is to wait' bit and said they found it confusing but I just meant that she knows what's going to pass and she has to just see it all happen and that waiting period, just knowing must be agonising.

 

Lady of courage,

Lady of strength

Lady of Fensalir

Knower of fate.

 

Lady of looms,

Lady of labour,

Lady of Fensalir,

Your agony is to wait.

 

Lady of childbirth,

Loosener of bairns.

Lady of Fensalir,

Life's helper and aid.

 

Great Lady Frigga,

Fjorgvinn's daughter.

First among the Asynjur

Be with us tonight!

Edited by Birka
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i love both these odes to frigga, absolutely beautiful. Planning on having a natter with her tonight since me and my hubby are ttc

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Alice Karlsdottir has quite a good ritual to Frigga if you'd like me to dig it out for you.

 

Yes please if you can without too much effort - it sounds interesting.

 

Here's a call (usually sung) that I wrote to Frigga a while back. People have commented on the 'your agony is to wait' bit and said they found it confusing but I just meant that she knows what's going to pass and she has to just see it all happen and that waiting period, just knowing must be agonising.

 

A very nice song and an interesting observation - I'll think about this ...

 

Waes Hael

Marcus

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Same traditions in southern European pre-Christian practises as well - I'd be surprised if it wasn't pretty universal, the offering of a gift in exchange for help.

 

In the town in spain where my family mostly live there is a huge cemetary at the gate of which is a small catholic church. One wall of this church is covered by plaits of hair. Women who have asked something of God cut these plaits off as a sort of offering or a symbol of self sacrifice to God and in thanks for prayers which have been answered. So the ritual of giving to a God is extant even in Christianity..... the big daddy of all religions. Whether this practice has its roots in paganism I don't know.

 

Mike

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It's only courteous though, don't you think?

 

Wouldn't it be a bit rude to just take for granted that the gods'll pitch up for you - like they've nothing else to do - whenever you summon them? Like they're just at your beck and call?

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For those interested in Alice Karlsdottir's stuff on Frigga please PM me.

 

Pomona - I couldn't agree more. That mentality fascinates me.

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Just throwing a few ideas around to fuel the debate :P

 

Deities are very powerful and supernatural, so what would they do with an offering from this earth? Wouldn't anything we offer seem really lame?

 

Deities are also supposedly omniscient (if you can talk to them and they hear your thoughts), therefore surely they would know if a simple "thank you" was sincere or not. Does this then render any further demonstration of thanks, such as an offering, unnecessary?

 

Don't deities get bored of all this grovelling and sacrificing? Would they rather we stop all that and just have a normal, respectful conversation? We are all mature adults after all. For example, I respect my parents, but I'm not going to give them a gift of thanks every time I ask them for something basic.

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Deities are very powerful and supernatural, so what would they do with an offering from this earth? Wouldn't anything we offer seem really lame?

 

Well I don't regard my deities as "supernatural" - they're as much part of the multiverse as I am.

 

Deities are also supposedly omniscient (if you can talk to them and they hear your thoughts), therefore surely they would know if a simple "thank you" was sincere or not.

 

Believers in monotheistic gods often believe they are omniscient. It's not something I believe to be true.

 

Don't deities get bored of all this grovelling and sacrificing? Would they rather we stop all that and just have a normal, respectful conversation?

 

Well - heathens don't "grovel". A blot (or sacrifice) is more a ritual of mutual gift giving. We're not trying to get our Gods to do us favours nor are we slaves. Rather it is more a way to nourish friendship. Most of us have a relationship with the Gods (or at least some of the Gods) - the blot nourishs this friendship.

 

I always think of it as a bit like remembering Mothers day with flowers - my mother mightn't necessarily need any more flowers - but the act of giving them shows I remember her, love her and respect her as my mother. That's the real gift - but it's symbolised through an actual physical gift of a bunch of flowers.

 

Marcus

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