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Monica Soto

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Stories, Myths And Imagination - what sort of role...


Guest fizzyclare1
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okay...I was wonderin...

 

what sort of role do stories, myths and imagination take for you in your um...faith/belief system/religion.

 

do you reenact stories in plays and such...(if not you, do you watch/listen to retellings of stories/myths)

 

what sort of things might you 'take' from the experience, does it fire your imagination? new learning?

 

Does it have an impact on your 'practice' what ever that maybe, or is it something a bit more subtle..like can it change your view of the world and so on...

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I find stories can be a great teaching device. Also I find they help me to develop my journeying skills.

 

I don’t re-enact stories outwardly but I do get a lot of enjoyment out of reading them.

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To me, stories are absolutely essential to our social consciousness and identity, they help us make sense of our world. R/reality is created from primal consciousness and out of the raw R/reality we create what we know as the world through a kind of personal and collective subconscious storytelling/enculturation kindof like mass hypnosis. Because language is so fundamental to our identity as humans (we even have evolved a separate area of the brain for it), we use words to mould our personal R/realities through stories and construct our group/social R/reality as a kind of collective mythology that exists through consensus and grows/changes through accumulated so can be thought of like an independent living entity or aetheric mirror (cf. morphogenetic fields, etc.)... I think these seem to be species-specific, ie. each associated with different animals/species, but not entirely separate from each other so still all connected (kindof like ood-consciousness :o_cute:). Imagination is our doorway into this collective consciousness, the source of true creativity/novelty/inspiration and can provide a light for divination. We dont have words to describe these things properly so I probably havent made much sense, but at least I tried! :P

Edited by Abraxas
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I also think fairy stories are one thing that people should always experience for themselves.

I agree with you Xalle.

just because the seem make believe it doesnt mean that arent real.

Beatrix Potter knew about the nature around her, she just wrote it in stories.

Ages when i had step kids one of then said fairy stories were stupid and not real . I replied yes but at the time they may have seemed real.

I used to read a great deal, enid byton, the tales of narnia fasinated me when i was young and i do think in a way they helped me understand my path later on. the tales of centaurs and tree spirits lead me onto books about myth and legends.

Of course it also helped me imagination wise in adult hood being able to write childrens story and brining out a book of poems for the darling little sprogs.

Edited by artywitch
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There is more truth and real magick in fairy tales than any other book written specifically on the subject. IMO.

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:rolleyes: :o_claps: :o_claps:

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plays always seem to have a bigger impct on me emotionally, maybe its because I am seeing people on a stage (and therefore visual) where I can see the body language and not just the words, I become more engrossed by it, and not in the same way as say, a tv series.

 

I often wonder also is it similar for historical types of things such as geneaology. for example, when I look up my family tree and see bits of history in the form of birth certificates, or bits of information from newspapers about people i know etc, this gives me a sense of connection whicch is a good thing for me.

 

Personally, I dont do renactment, but I do enjoy it when the royal armouries puts on those tournaments. I also find falconry displays put me in touch with a world that is very 'not my world'. subjectively I feel as though I am peeking into another world and its quite exciting.

 

I also recall the sense of wonder when I was a child when I read stories that invited me to secret but 'real' worlds of fairies, elves gnomes, robin hood, feeling terrified by the kiddie catcher in one of hans christian anderson stories. a sort of transportation to another world.

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There is more truth and real magick in fairy tales than any other book written specifically on the subject. IMO.

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Which is why any kids of mine will be fed a solid diet of Grimm's from day one.

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I've been reading Grimm's to David. He's not terribly impressed, maybe The 12 Dancing Princesses was a poor place to start.

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Nah, in spite of what child psychologists say, kids like gruesome...try the Devil and his Grandmother...

 

This would also make a nice tale to adapt for him:

 

http://www.fairytalechannel.org/2009_11_26_archive.html

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The stories (Grimm, the Eddas, heroic lays, et cetera) are an *essential* part of my heathenry.

 

From what I know, I suspect that stories around the campfire and told by skalds at festivals would have constituted a considerable part of the average pagan's information about gods, wights, heroes and the greater mythology of their culture in times gone by.

 

To me, if I am to recapture anything of the original essence of my heathen practice, then I need to start incorporating storytelling more into my day to day heathenry.

 

At the Jorvik viking festival a couple of years ago, I saw Hugh Lupton tell the tale of Beowulf and I have to say it was an amazing experience.

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I keep thinking of answering this one, but my brain then rolloercoasters and I think I would have to write a book :rolleyes:

 

Stories are just so much of it! Stories that teach, stories that trigger, stories that live and breathe. I always loved the quote from Murial Rukeyser, "the universe is made of stories, not atoms."

 

Stories have a reflexive, two way relationship with our spiritual, psychological and social worlds. They are both formed by them and form them. They encode the morality of an age while forming the morality of tomorrow.

 

I do use story as metaphor in trance meditation sessions and have used it in straight hypnotherapy sessions in the past.

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yeah, I know where you are coming from animystic, I had a lot of trouble composing the post because of it.

 

I mean there are stories that are just stories, an enjoyable read, and then there are stories about the world (like a brief history of time by stephen hawking - yes I know its not fiction) that capture a broad audience and for some reason resonate in a much deeper way.

 

Like the arthurian legends, robin hood, resonate so deeply that there has been a quest to find out whether there is some truth behind the story (whereby various suggestions have been made by various authors)

 

I agree, storys engage our minds our imaginations and I think we seek some kind of inner truth sometimes (whether that is a moral truth, a spiritual truth or what ever). for me it is a reconnection with the impossible, the weird and the wonderful...:)

 

Have you read joseph campbells 'hero with a thoussand faces' its considered to be a 'classic' read by some and is heavily influenced by the works of various psychodynamic peeps, but especially carl jung.

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Have you read joseph campbells 'hero with a thoussand faces' its considered to be a 'classic' read by some and is heavily influenced by the works of various psychodynamic peeps, but especially carl jung.

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I'm ambivalent about Campbell. I enjoy his work and I think it has an element of genius in pinning down *one* aspect of story... but there is a tendency to see his work as definitive and to me that narrows understanding of what story is. And I don't imagine Campbell ever saw it that way. Its like the old myth of the 5 blind men and the elephant. Campbell has given us a deeper insight into the trunk :)

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I've been reading Grimm's to David. He's not terribly impressed, maybe The 12 Dancing Princesses was a poor place to start.

396791[/snapback]

 

I used to love the three billy goats gruff when I was a tot, that ladybird book was well worn, frayed at the edges, I loved the heroic nature of it, beating the big bad troll...feeling sorry for the little goat and the challenge of the middle sized goat and great big goat who knocked the troll to kingdom come...aaaaah...

 

and then came walt disney.....

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Stories, legends and myths play a huge part in my life and my beliefs.

 

I love the Grimm tales along with so many. many others.

 

After all without story telling nobody would know much at all. :(

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