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Imbolc


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I don't really. It's not one that really means much to me. If I remember I might light a few candles or plant a bulb but only if I remember.

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I know this is somewhat early, but just wondering how you guys celebrate this?

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Definitely - In a sad /happy way. I LOVE the dark times. This year in particular has been spectacular over the Solstice. The emergence of the snowdrops mark the end of "My Time". They flood a small part of my garden that I very rarely tread on.

 

aygglil.jpg

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I know this is somewhat early, but just wondering how you guys celebrate this?

404239[/snapback]

 

Bum - Out of edit time!

 

I'd better answer the question!

 

I will go up to a high point above the Shropshire plain and look down on the arable and woodland.

 

The nearest field will be green as its planted with winter cerials. Others will be ploughed. I will also look for the golden haze over the trees that mean the buds are just colouring up. Its been cold so they may not.

 

We are also organising a song/storytelling/ritual.

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I know this is somewhat early, but just wondering how you guys celebrate this?

404239[/snapback]

 

I don't celebrate it as Imbolc, I acknowledge it as Candlemas. I usually buy a pot of snowdrops for someone, used to be for my mum but now some other lucky person gets them.

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I really don't do much other than light a candle and pause for a few moments to reflect... that is if I remember! :(

 

 

edited to fix silly typos!

Edited by LoonyLuna
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This is one of my favourite ones, full of promise for the year ahead. I think of it as the time when the light is beginning to 'spark' within us and we begin to see the first glimmerings of what we might begin to grow in ourselves and in our lives.

 

I`ve celebrated in different ways over the years, but one of my favourites is to light sparklers, perhaps during a ritual, in order to symbolise that coming to life.

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We go on a snowdrop hunt.

 

It's Brigid's festival. If we do a ritual it involves milk, candles, anything white. We bless candles for the coming year. Imbue them with our wishes for the coming year.

I like Imbolc.

 

The Daily Fail says Imbolc means "The Lactating Sheep". Imbolc actually means "In the belly (im bolg) - in the belly of Winter. ( Oimelc - an alternative name - means Ewe Milk, or lactating sheep if you are bent on being rude.)

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ooooo, I love this one, its the time when I go outside and I can sense spring, but I don't tie it to a particular day or such, just when the feeling 'hits' me.

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I dance around saying whoop whoop the snow drops are out and sort through my seeds. Imolc is garden centre month.

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Me too! I planted some snow drop, crocus and daffodil bulbs in my garden last September. I am really excited about watching them coming through.

 

The snow drops are already coming up through the ground.

 

Imbolc to me is the start of the growing season, and I spend most of February deciding what to grow this year, starting off seeds, preparing pots, etc.

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I think it's the really good time to go for a country walk, it's a feel of freshness & excitement in nature of everything to come

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ooooo, I love this one, its the time when I go outside and I can sense spring, but I don't tie it to a particular day or such, just when the feeling 'hits' me.

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Quite right too. Its not a Sun festival its one of the Fire Festivals which for me are much more flexible in their timing and in some ways more intimate. If the snowdrops are not out then its not Imbolc.

 

Fred's answer gives you two pronunciations. Im-bolk and Imolk but I've never worried about the names anyway its the recognition of time that matters to me.

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A couple of years ago, my OH built a small forge so that he and a friend could make .. well, forge things - knives swords, stangs and so on. As Brigid is the goddess for blacksmiths, we created a bed and a goddess figure. After a short ritural, Brigid is put to bed, in her place in the forge! We also have a firepit and, has been said above, as it is a fire festival, usually have a large bonfire too.

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When is Imbolc... ?

Do you pronounce it IM-BULK?

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February 2nd. I don't call it Imbolc because I don't follow a pseudo-Celtic path, so I can't help you with the pronunciation.

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It is fun...sending the women representing Bride out of the house...so as to invite her in...with laughter and acclamation...a great family event...prepare her square bed where she might lay using a doll to represent her...a wonderful time of year for rituel and informal such little feast at home...

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  • 3 weeks later...
It is fun...sending the women representing Bride out of the house...so as to invite her in...with laughter and acclamation...a great family event...prepare her square bed where she might lay using a doll to represent her...a wonderful time of year for rituel and informal such little feast at home...

407147[/snapback]

Hope everyone has a fab imbolc, no matter how you celebrate it!

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I shall be going hunting for the right rocks to go into my Japanese garden. :D

 

Though I don't celebrate Ibolc, the complete change of my garden at this point in the year has to be good - I will have all year from this point to look frowar to the changing seasons in the new garden.

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Imbolc is, for me, the New Year, as it is the start of the growing season (even if it's only sowing seeds indoors). I usually celebrate by getting things organised for the forthcoming planting, sowing seeds, getting the veg beds ready etc. This year, as I've got flu, it will be a more a case of planning than doing, which is a bit frustrating :D

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Go for a walk, look for signs of spring awakening (went to Lyminge forest and there weren't many signs, but did some fairly spectacular puddle jumping - I had cunningly had the forethrought to take a 4 year old with me so did not look too out of place).

 

Sunday, circle had out Imbolc feast (lots of egg and cheese dishes).

 

Won't do any ritual nods until I see some definite signs of the season changing, but usually have a bit of a spring clean, get rid of some clutter (to make room for new things to enter in to my life).

 

Q

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Snowdrops are coming out.

Will be heralding the ritual on Saturday.

 

Have a great time everyone - its the spark of hope for new beginnings!

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  • 2 weeks later...
I know this is somewhat early, but just wondering how you guys celebrate this?

404239[/snapback]

 

 

I tend to make a small personal effort to mark things rather then doing elaborate rituals. There are no imbolc sites remembered in folklore or lit. as far as Im aware so Id usually go out in or around dawn to my local trad assembly place or a local medieval sacred site. Id leave a small offering and then go back to the edge and walk clockwise around it while meditating. If the response of my presence isnt negative I'll hang around a while looking for signs in nature and generally enjoying the place before I head home.

 

Its kind of boring to watch but I find it productive and I enjoy it.

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