Jump to content

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

Gods And Goddesses - I can already see some people thinking 'not this subject again


Guest Vintage Pixie
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am apologizing now if this has already been brought up!

 

I was wondering about the Gods and Goddesses. While I have been researching in the God's and Goddesses I noticed that there are a numerous

amount such as Egyptian, Celtic, Greek, Norse, Roman....the list is endless!

My question is (as silly as it sounds sorry huh.gif) can you believe in say a goddess in the Celtic tradition such as Brighid AND a goddess from the Greek

tradition such as Aphrodite or are you 'suppose' to stick to one tradition.

 

Hope this makes some sense!

 

Funny story I remembered while researching this that I thought I would share!

When I was a young girl (around 6-7yrs old) our topic for that year in my school was the Greeks, so we researched, coloured in numerous amount

of things, watched videos etc, but one thing that stood out for me was the gods and goddesses, I found them fascinating and drawn to them so

one day when we were writing on our tea bag stained paper I told my supply teacher that I think I believe in them and her reply to me was this, @don't

be so silly they don't exist!', at the time I kept silent about this matter but now looking back I wished I'd at least asked her 'What makes you think that

your God is any different or special to mine?'

 

Anyway enough of my history! Hope you are all well tongue.gif xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

Well, you can believe in anything you want, really, when you think about it, nobody really can tell you not to.

 

As a polytheist I believe in many gods, in fact, I believe in ALL gods, in all pantheons. I just don’t worship or work with them all, just a very few. Now, if you believe in all gods being part of one "divine", and being aspects of that "divine" or "one", then there’s nothing to stop you working with the, say, Zeus aspect and the Epona aspect at the same time, depending on what you’re trying to achieve. But if you believe that the gods are as distinct and as separate as you and I, then I believe you should have more care about mixing and matching as they may not get on and that could cause problems.

 

Moreoever, I believe that you don’t pick a god simply because it looks right on paper for what you need: you introduce yourself first, make offerings, try and get on their good side before you ask for any favours/help. And don’t expect to be welcomed with open arms just because you turned up ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might be worth looking at the Chaos magick stuff, such as condensed Chaos (Phil Hine) regarding belief it poses some interesting questions for a relative newcomer.

 

 

MM :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Pomona said, no one can tell you what you can or can't believe. But people will still judge you and there will be some who would view you as a dilettante of the gods for it. I'll admit that I'm a bit cynical towards pic 'n' mix pantheons (though to a degree all pantheons are pick 'n' mix). Whilst I'm not one to worship gods my thinking is that it would be important to study the cultures from which your chosen gods emerged;taking gods from many different cultures would make this more difficult and time consuming than sticking to one culture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Pomona said, no one can tell you what you can or can't believe. But people will still judge you and there will be some who would view you as a dilettante of the gods for it. I'll admit that I'm a bit cynical towards pic 'n' mix pantheons (though to a degree all pantheons are pick 'n' mix). Whilst I'm not one to worship gods my thinking is that it would be important to study the cultures from which your chosen gods emerged;taking gods from many different cultures would make this more difficult and time consuming than sticking to one culture.

 

Which I would agree with if certain Gods didn't choose me and irritatingly be from highly disparate cultures...dry.gif

 

And I just realized this was my 1,000 post woot! :)

 

 

 

Edited by Dreigiau
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Pomona said, no one can tell you what you can or can't believe. But people will still judge you and there will be some who would view you as a dilettante of the gods for it. I'll admit that I'm a bit cynical towards pic 'n' mix pantheons (though to a degree all pantheons are pick 'n' mix). Whilst I'm not one to worship gods my thinking is that it would be important to study the cultures from which your chosen gods emerged;taking gods from many different cultures would make this more difficult and time consuming than sticking to one culture.

 

Which I would agree with if certain Gods didn't choose me and irritatingly be from highly disparate cultures...dry.gif

 

And I just realized this was my 1,000 post woot! :)

 

 

 

 

 

Many thanks for all your comments! And congrats on your 1000 post! woop woop! biggrin.gif xx

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you look back over history, gods and goddesses from different pantheons/cultures have been 'adapted for use' as the different cultures mixed and the beliefs have been combined. For example, the roman baths were (still are!!) a temple to Sulis-Minerva. Sulis being the likely celtic diety of the spring and Minerva the Roman goddess. Minerva can further be equated with the greek goddess Athena, and mythology regarding Minerva could have been heavily influenced from the ancient Greeks. Therfore, since ancint times, there has been some 'over lapping of ideas' as the cultures meet. So....you may beleive that different gods/goddesses are faces/expressions of a single divine source, or people are 'tapping' into different faces/expressions of a Goddess, or maybe that they are individual dieties. Really, in my opnion it comes down to how you feel. If you feel drawn to a particular diety then fine, that is how you find the divine/understand your world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

the way i see it, its all part of the same thing, combining the pomonas and stargazers posts. they are all manifestations of the same power and there have been 'over laping ideas' . but you said one very important thing: they choose you. if you feel that certain gods or goddesses are right for you they probably are. just look for signs and focus on the ones that draw you to them, you can focus on only one pantheon if you choose but in my experience if a god or a goddess chooses you(from a different pantheon), you really cant run and hide :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am apologizing now if this has already been brought up!

 

I was wondering about the Gods and Goddesses. While I have been researching in the God's and Goddesses I noticed that there are a numerous

amount such as Egyptian, Celtic, Greek, Norse, Roman....the list is endless!

My question is (as silly as it sounds sorry huh.gif) can you believe in say a goddess in the Celtic tradition such as Brighid AND a goddess from the Greek

tradition such as Aphrodite or are you 'suppose' to stick to one tradition.

 

 

You believe what you believe.

 

Belief isn't a choice, it is the result of your own experiences, study and sense of spiritual truth. How you approach these things and where you find them, are nobody's business but your own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now I'll throw a spanner in the works.. You could be like me and have decided that there are no Gods or Goddesses.

A year ago I was wanting to find them and learn about them. Then I realised that I have never believed in the xtian God or Jesus so why on earth would I believe in others?

I belive however in the spirit world.

This is just my belief ofcourse and I'm certainly not out to convince anyone or offend anyone. I have the utmost respect for everyone and their beliefs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes can can mix your Pantheons, but the Deities may not necessarily get on with each other. The Deities choose you or adopt you rather than the other way round. But there is no harm ( and you have to start somewhere) in introducing yourself to the God/Goddess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

Most of the Gods are the same but with different names - compare Zeus to Odin to Wotan for example. The best thing in my mind is to worship the Gods in that particular land that have been there historically. So being in the UK we worship the Gods that the Celts believed in. And if I were to travel to Egypt, or North America, then the ancient gods that were worshipped there would be the most appropriate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to disagree with most of that Electric Wizard :D

 

I don't believe that the Gods are the same but with different names, I think they're entirely distinct and that the myths bear this out. Zeus, for example, has no correlation to Odhinn: none of the same attributes other than the head of the pantheon. As far as I know, Odhinn is not the Thunder God, that's Thor, and Zeus' emblem is the lightening bolt. Hera is not Sif, they have no similar myths or legends, only their role as spouse links them.

 

And, in the British Isles (as we know them today), it was more than the Celtic gods who were worshipped. Pre-Celtic ones, Pictish ones, Roman (and the vast collection they brought with them from other conquered cultures), and of course Anglo Saxon gods during that period. So even in the UK, I think you can "legitimately" claim a connection to, and worship a god of many different pantheons by dint of them being historically evident in this land :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the Gods are the same but with different names - compare Zeus to Odin to Wotan for example. The best thing in my mind is to worship the Gods in that particular land that have been there historically. So being in the UK we worship the Gods that the Celts believed in. And if I were to travel to Egypt, or North America, then the ancient gods that were worshipped there would be the most appropriate.

 

I personally do not hold with the statement that "most of the gods are the same but with different names ........ " :) My thoughts are that there is one divine energy from which all energies derive .. but that is another debate.

 

In the UK, it is not just the Celts' deities who were worshipped but the many who came with other conquerors - saxon, roman, northern ....... and so on!

 

 

PS - I see that Pomona has just pipped me at the post - literally - with her comments above ......... I will not say "great minds think alike ... " oh well, go on then :o_youpi:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the Gods are the same but with different names - compare Zeus to Odin to Wotan for example.

 

No. Sorry, I'm going to have to disagree with you on that one. Óðinn is not Zeus. He is so not. As a hard polytheist, for me the gods all have very distinct personalities and existences.

 

The best thing in my mind is to worship the Gods in that particular land that have been there historically.

 

I'd kind of agree with you on this. I always think that it's a good starting point to make contact with the gods where you are. However, in my experience, the gods are no respecters of place. I've had a goddess from the other side of the world and from a pantheon I had absolutely no links with that I knew of, contact me.

 

You also have to be careful that you don't end up going down the folkish route. I've known that happen to people. Look to your local gods, sure, but they're not your exclusive property.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Warning. Warning. Electricwizard has upset the polytheists. Please retreat to a safe location until the indignation subsides. :o_wink:

 

 

Other than that, I'd say what most others have said. You're not "supposed" to do anything. If a god/dess makes themselves known to you then, unless you don't actually want anything to do with them (which is ok), then you can respond. Equally, don't be surprised if none of them make an appearence, it's not unusual.

Edited by Penardun
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What was said above about finding the gods in your locality has always made sense to me (though I didn't always think of them as 'gods'. But I've been trying to puzzle out an approach to gods more recently. And when I think of Britain, there would have been Celtic gods. Then the Romans came and brought their gods and said that some of the Celtic gods were the same as some of their gods. Then the Saxons and Vikings came and their gods were then worshipped here alongside the Celtic ones. And then there was christianity. But I wonder, if before this, the gods of the locality and the gods worshipped by people who moved in, could mix together if the peoole mixed together? A

 

And I agree as was said above, that Odinn is not Zeus. But what about Zeus and Jupiter? Or Odinn and Woden? And do people see a difference between these gods who come from somewhere else and the spirits of the woods and the local places?

 

Sorry for all the questions but I'm trying to think all this through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Or Odinn and Woden? And do people see a difference between these gods who come from somewhere else and the spirits of the woods and the local places?

 

 

My short answer is yes - most Gods were/are geographically & tribally distinct. When people equate Gods from different cultures - it's usually because they haven't really done their homework in actually finding out about each particular god.

 

Anyway I commend and recommend Phillip A Shaw's PhD thesis "Uses of Woden" for a far better longer answer. You can access it here: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/393/1/uk_bl_ethos_270854.pdf

 

Marcus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or Odinn and Woden? And do people see a difference between these gods who come from somewhere else and the spirits of the woods and the local places?

 

 

My short answer is yes - most Gods were/are geographically & tribally distinct. When people equate Gods from different cultures - it's usually because they haven't really done their homework in actually finding out about each particular god.

 

Anyway I commend and recommend Phillip A Shaw's PhD thesis "Uses of Woden" for a far better longer answer. You can access it here: http://etheses.white...thos_270854.pdf

 

Marcus

 

Thanks for the link. I've downloaded the file and will read through it when I can.

 

Thanks too for the 'short answer'. But what I was really asking was something more general. I can see why a god in the Greek pantheon shouldn't be spoken of as equivalent to one in the Norse pantheon. But if worshippers of Odinn migrate from Scandinavia to Britain and their language changes a bit and they start to call him Woden, is he a different god? If he is because of the different place his worshippers now live in, does he take on characteristics of one of the gods already in that place, say Celtic gods?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But if worshippers of Odinn migrate from Scandinavia to Britain and their language changes a bit and they start to call him Woden, is he a different god? If he is because of the different place his worshippers now live in, does he take on characteristics of one of the gods already in that place, say Celtic gods?

 

that's a difficult question to answer because different people experience different things. I have known someone who told me she experienced Thor as distinctly different from Thunor, and Odhinn as different from Woden.

 

I'm not sure what the 'characteristics' of Celtic gods might be. Can you elucidate? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

that's a difficult question to answer because different people experience different things. I have known someone who told me she experienced Thor as distinctly different from Thunor, and Odhinn as different from Woden.

 

I'm not sure what the 'characteristics' of Celtic gods might be. Can you elucidate? :)

 

Um, not really. I only gave that as an example for the question about worshippers of a god moving onto a territory that already had gods and the god name changing a bit, and would it be the same god? I thought Odinn and Woden might be an example of this, but the PhD thesis that Marcus gave the link to argues against any link between the Norse Odinn and the German Wodan, and therefore with Woden. But the same example could be given of the Germanic Wodan and English Woden, with Saxons bringing their worship of the god to Britain where there were already others gods. Would people say Wodan and Woden are the same god? Or did he change when he came to Britain?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a newbie I'm half expecting to get my head bitten off for this, but here goes....

 

I personally see no problem in picking and mixing your deities after all as some posters have inferred deities pick and mix their followers/adherents and if it's good enough for them it's good enough for us mortals (I'm sorry I don't like the word worship, because if a deity demands to be worshiped then he or she must be very insecure :D ).

 

From my perspective as I don't really know any of the deities yet I couldn't comment from personal experience, but I hear some calling to me and I'm trying to work out who it is and why.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, you're not going to get your head bitten off, but I am going to disagree with you.

 

For one thing, IME, the gods pick US, and we don't get much of a choice about who comes calling, which is why you find people with the same experiences of when the same god called on them, and why there are people who know nothing about their god, because their task is to find out who it is and why it picked them.

 

And for another, gods aren't to be summoned just because someone wants them (hence the "they pick you" thing). And, if you pick and mix, how do you know they'll get on if you do persuade them to pop along to your ritual? How do you know that because you've picked on Nemesis and Sif, say, that it's not going to horribly, horribly backfire on you?

 

In my experience, the gods aren't Woolworth sweeties: they're distinct entities with personalities that range from indifferent to malevolent, and you want to be very careful how you handle them...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely! Speaking for myself, I have never chosen a god - the gods have always called on me. Not always what/who I expected/wanted either. Although there's always a reason - it just sometimes takes a long time to work it out. There are gods I would like to have a relationship with, but they're clearly not interested in me. That's life. :)

 

I would be very, very cautious of calling on a group of random deities. I think that's asking for trouble. However, Uthain, if you can hear them calling you that's a good start. Now you just have to work out who they are....... :o_wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HI, I have always been an atheist and at first I was struggling with the concept of now believing that there are gods and goddess. Then on here some one mentioned having deities as a representation of god and goddess which has helped me so much as I myself have always has a very strong interest in the Greek gods! Especially Athena and Poseidon... I even dressed up as Athena for my 21st birthday last year! They have always stuck with me so I don't see anything wrong with it at all... They are now my chosen deities and I know I still have soo much to learn but just figuring out this for myself has helped me a lot to connect to paganism...

 

So thank you again whomever pointed out deities to me! It was in another post and I can't remember your name Sorry!

 

*Ashley*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Athena and Poseidon? Really??

 

That's interesting. Those two are rivals, Poseidon was pretty narked at Athena for losing the city of Athens to Her... One of "my" gods is Minerva (the Roman Athena) and Poseidon and I do NOT get on - I tried contacting him once and found him to be an irascible, and pretty darned terrifying piece of work - I've never contacted him again. Someone here also posited the view that my extreme sea-sickness could be Poseidon's way of "punishing" me for being a devotee of Minerva, which I don't have any trouble in believing...

 

So I'm really quite amazed and fascinated that you "couple" Athena and Poseidon together :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Pomona and Freydis for the comment. Apologies for the lack of clairty which I think has led you take my pick and mix equation literally - my bad. What I was alluding to was this: take three different people in the same town. One a fisherman, the other a school teacher and third owns a guesthouse. Now from my perspective each is likely to call on different deities becasue each has slightly different needs in their lives, even though a single God may have originally called on all three.

 

I agree wholeheartedly that randomly picking Gods is not a good idea (which was not what I was recommending in any way), as after all we don't randomly pick our closest friends, and that there are going be times we don't have a say in the matter just as we don't have a say in who our blood relations are. What I was inferring is that my own feelings are that your own personal pantheon should reflect yourself and what you feel/believe rather than a rigid doctrine based on culture, ethnicity, geography, etc; and should compliment the God or Gods that came looking for you.

 

Hope that's clearer!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Athena and Poseidon? Really??

 

That's interesting. Those two are rivals, Poseidon was pretty narked at Athena for losing the city of Athens to Her... One of "my" gods is Minerva (the Roman Athena) and Poseidon and I do NOT get on - I tried contacting him once and found him to be an irascible, and pretty darned terrifying piece of work - I've never contacted him again. Someone here also posited the view that my extreme sea-sickness could be Poseidon's way of "punishing" me for being a devotee of Minerva, which I don't have any trouble in believing...

 

So I'm really quite amazed and fascinated that you "couple" Athena and Poseidon together :)

 

I know it is really strange, I don't know why I have always been drawn to both of them! It sounds silly but I don't want to choose between them and I think maybe they know that because I've never felt like I've had to... hopefully it will carry on in this way as I don't think I could choose one or the other.

 

Believe me when I say I know it's a strange 'couple' as you said but maybe there is a reason for this?

 

*Ashley*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Udhain, I think your post deserves its own thread so I'm going to split this topic and put your post as the beginning of a new thread :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Moonsmith
      I’ve posted a link (in links) to a BBC article in today’s news just to illustrate a bit of the colourful side of Paganism.  Perhaps it will do something to balance my prosaic take on the subject. i know little of Witchcraft but I enjoyed the article and like her approach.  
    • Ellinas
      👍 It's as good a position as any and better than quite a few.  
    • Stonehugger
      Yes, it was in Nettle's "Who are your deities?" thread. I said "I seem to have become an atheist. That was never my plan, but here I am." Veggiedancer later said it better than me - "I don’t exactly believe in deities as such. I think they come from  our minds. Archetypes, ways of identify or characterising the spirit/ magic/ life or whatever it is we sense around us. Ways our minds try to explain the unexplainable to us???"
    • Moonsmith
      I’m probably second guessing Nettle wrongly but it wasn’t all that long ago that you would have read posts about alters, magic, Shamanism, spells etc. I think it was either Teatimetreat or Drachenfach that had a hex on her handbag and her car.  When the car was stolen it crashed and the thief was caught. I agree and would very much like to see more of the colourful side of Paganism back here.  Quite right Ellinas.  I do not understand how anyone can claim to be Pantheist (or even pantheist) and atheist at the same time even though the most prominent Pantheists do exactly that.  As I’ve said elsewhere: why can’t they call themselves Panists.  The prefix “pan” means everything and everywhere as in “pandemic”.  The god’s name arose from the adjective so it wouldn’t necessarily mean a devotee of Pan. pee ess - it may be worth mentioning that there are a vast number of belief groups under the umbrella word Paganism.  Druids Witches, Polytheist and Shaman are only a small part of what the greater picture of Paganism depicts. Dunno and don’t care are probably the biggest groups.
    • Ellinas
      All the above, plus the impression of a preponderance of atheism is currently, as well as historically, inaccurate.  Certainly, I am no atheist.  I believe MS rejects the term as applicable to himself.  Stonehugger, I think, recently said he had headed in that direction, but I've not seen the other resident atheists for a while. However, our ideas of deity are not the same, necessarily.
×
×
  • Create New...