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Pagan Prayers?


Guest StephanieSmile
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Hi,

 

I'm quite new to paganism, and I was just wondering, are there any written prayers for paganism? Prayer may not be the right word but I don't know how else to describe it. I don't specifically mean vital ones, just if there are any out there.

 

Thanks,

Steph :)

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Hi,

 

There's a thread going around about "A Book of Pagan Prayer" by someone or other. (Look it up, little green book, gold writing on the cover). Although not all of the prayers will be relevant to you and your own beliefs there's quite a bit about different forms of prayer and some lovely prayers you can use out of the book or as inspiration. Many people seem to feel this book is trying to tell people what to do. I don't think that at all, and I think if you take the book in the way it's offered it can be very useful. Also, don't worry when people answer this thread with an "I don't pray, I speak to my gods!". Lots of people seem to equate "praying" with being Christian and grovelling, and therefore have a kind of gut reaction about it but don't let it put you off using the word if you feel it describes best what you do, it's a perfectly valid word!

 

If you mean a set "liturgy" as such, then no. Certain individuals and groups/covens/groves/whatever will have their own set things that they say at set times and specific times of the year, and within Wicca, for instance, you may find that some of them are very similar across the board. But there is no all encompassing pagan set-of-stuff-to-say. :)

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Indeed, there are lots of prayers written down really, but nothing that everyone will use universally.

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I've come across Coven Oaths (& some Coven Oaf's :lol: ) which may include pledges to the "Old One's" but in my case never prayers as such. I suppose written rituals, when said with passion, can come over prayer like especially if the are directed at a certain deity(s). Both are similar in that the doer's are trying to amend the status quo but IMO what's different that The Witch, thru the creation of spirit, taps into the deities as opposed to Prayer, where they whinge, say they are not worthy & hope that Jehonah smiles graciously on them.

 

That's my take on it, although I guess others will view things differently :D

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Tibs, the Christians already think they own the word marriage, I really am hoping not to give them reason to think they own the word "prayer" as well! "Praying" is simply "communicating with gods" but without as many wasted syllables.

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This is a version I am probably not supposed to but I adapt it now and again

 

Grant, O God and Goddess, Thy protection;

and in protection, strength;

and in strength, understanding;

and understanding, knowledge;

and in knowledge, the knowledge of justice;

and in the knowledge of justice, the love of it;

and in that love, the love of all existences;

and in the love of all existences, the love of the God and Goddess;

God and Goddess and all goodness.

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Holy Mother in whom we live, move and have our being

from you all things emerge and unto you all things return.

 

Open our hearts this blessed day, touch our bodies and our minds,

walk with us through the gates of power.

In shadow and starlight,

in fire meeting earth, in wind on the ocean and the sweet kiss of life.

Blessed be our journey.

 

(The first paragraph is the Feri prayer which opens every Feri ritual & prayer; the second paragraph is by Thorn Coyle - a Feri teacher.)

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I really like the green Pagan prayer book - there's a red version for prayer in ritual that's really good too. I've collected some prayers out of various books, but I also write my own.

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Tibs, the Christians already think they own the word marriage, I really am hoping not to give them reason to think they own the word "prayer" as well! "Praying" is simply "communicating with gods" but without as many wasted syllables.

 

Well it's very much down to the individual, but the word prayer is a word I avoid due to the very Xtain usage of the word. So maybe they have hijacked the word, but it's something I've learnt to live with.

Prayer to me as got the connotation of how I describe previous in my mind & I'm sure any deity not worried in the slightest of my short comings as a Human Being while averting my eyes

Edited by tibbington
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Tibs, the Christians already think they own the word marriage, I really am hoping not to give them reason to think they own the word "prayer" as well! "Praying" is simply "communicating with gods" but without as many wasted syllables.

 

Well it's very much down to the individual, but the word prayer is a word I avoid due to the very Xtain usage of the word. So maybe they have hijacked the word, but it's something I've learnt to live with.

Prayer to me as got the connotation of how I describe previous in my mind & I'm sure any deity not worried in the slightest of my short comings as a Human Being while averting my eyes

 

On what "prayer" means to me also coming from a xtian background, I have to agree with you, Tibs! I infinitely prefer the idea that I have a conversation with the gods and goddesses which I hope to be a two-way thing. "Prayer" for me is an asking or a pleading for an outcome and I don't believe my communications with deity invariably follow that format. Maybe sometimes, I do ask/pray for something or an outcome, but not very often and it is not the main thread of my connection with my god/esses.

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This is a version I am probably not supposed to but I adapt it now and again

 

That is a version of the Gorsedd Prayer from Iolo Morgannwg's Barddas, one of the pillars of the revival period of Druidry. It is still in use in most of the orders who don't specifically reject revivalist Druidry (OBOD, BDO, AODA all use it) and adapting it for personal use is positively encouraged.

 

More versions here - http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/bim1/bim1123.htm

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Who would you be praying to? I mean, surely if you follow Wicca or Heathenry you would need prayers for specific gods? Do you even have gods? If not, again, who or what would you be praying to?

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:D I was responding more to the OP Bob. :)

 

I don't really understand the question as such I guess. I see structured prayer as something you find within, (obviously) structure, kinda like the Lords Prayer or the Hail Mary, there but impersonal and for specific gods/beings. If you wanted to make a prayer to a god, surely there is no need for it to follow a format or have a particular structure? I had always considered prayer to be nothing more that speaking to your god/s and structured prayer as a form of unification, everyone saying the same words at the same time.

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I find poetic structure a focus for connecting with a specific god - much like a small version of ritual. A lot of the time it's spontaneous, but I'm not a very off-the-cuff person. And I feel like certain gods will appreciate something poetic as an offering - Brighid, for example. I also use Scottish and other prayers that, for me, connect me to the right head-space for talking to my particular gods. Maybe it's

my years in evangelical xianity which put me right off the 'just chat to god' approach. I sort of feel like my gods deserve better - something ritual-style or poetic. But of course it's about each person's individual style. Ritual involving a lot of words always feels more magical and worshipful to me, but that's about me, not the god in question.

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Who would you be praying to? I mean, surely if you follow Wicca or Heathenry you would need prayers for specific gods? Do you even have gods? If not, again, who or what would you be praying to?

 

From what I was learning within the Non Wiccan Coven I was involved with, I was taught that the Gods were no more than capricious forces of nature who by nature are alround us & by recognising the correspondences that occur within the forces of nature, create magic. Basically things would happen but don't expect to be told they will happen. I think things did go deeper than that within the coven but I wasn't privy to that other than a few snippets & those questioned if the Coven was the best place for me to be.

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  • 2 months later...

I did used to quote a certain excerpt from Sigrdrífumál now and then but, that ended up feeling a little awkward for me.

 

Personally, these days I try to make something up on the spot. I don't always succeed, but sometimes I have spouted some quite tasty prose (and even poetry) on the fly like that. That just 'feels' like a better prayer/offering to me.

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why do people need to say pray. Why dont they say ask.

 

 

probally because ive had at least four people today say 'i will pray for your soul'.

 

in which i replied 'id rather you didnt ta'

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why do people need to say pray. Why dont they say ask.

 

 

Well, in christianity there are at least four different types of prayer, and asking is only one type. ;)

 

I once wrote a pagan prayer. I didn't mean to - it just got dictated to me (or that's what it felt like). The rhythm and feeling of it is based on a very famous Christian prayer known as St Theresa's Bookmark. This is the pagan version:

 

Let nothing befear thee: let nothing befright thee;

The darkness has passed and dawn's glory is here.

The wingtips that brushed thee, are driven before thee;

The gods shall watch o’er thee, oh child of their heart.

 

No nightmare shall harm thee, by darkness or daylight;

No creature shall haunt thee; in spirit or mind.

This thing that assailed thee, shall not dent thy courage;

Nor any more like it, o’ercome thy bright strength.

By this song I wash thee, of all of that evil;

Be free as thou once were, oh dear to their heart

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I have the green book in question, and I love it. :) I'm a writer in addition to being a pagan, and I see writing prayers (or whatever you'd like to call them) as a creative and meditational practice in and of itself. As I write, I think about the gods I am writing to, and feel closer to them. I love that book because I like getting ideas for my own works, and with most of the things in there, I can substitute my own gods or intents as required. I don't tend to respond to people telling me what to believe, so maybe I just didn't catch that while reading it. ;) At any rate, I quite like it, so don't feel it's a bad book because of that. It gives me a lot of inspiration all the time!

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I do actually; I've even started making prayer beads, deity specific, or made to order. I know people cringe at the connotations due to mostly Christian upbringing, but they're a focusing tool - a chant, a meditation, and can be quite useful. I write prose-poems for the strands, but mostly I just say what comes to me, heartfelt as needed.

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  • 1 month later...

Before I get out of bed and before I go to sleep, I say the folowing:-

 

I encircle myself with universal love and mother earths protection,

I'II allow nothing but positive thoughts and energies to affect me,

and I will not be influenced by the negativity by those that I encounter,

healthy am I,

happy am I,

pagan am I.

 

blessed be :o_wave:

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