Jump to content

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

Understanding Paganism


Elowen
 Share

Recommended Posts

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

It's an interesting read :)

 

However, I do dispute the assertion (or strong implication) that all Pagans adhere to the concept of "a Divinity". I recognise it mentions polytheism but it still infers the concept of "a" Divinity.

 

Many Pagans do indeed to adhere to that concept, but speaking for myself, I don't. My gods are distinct and discrete and individual as you and me and I don't hold any idea of a single "One" divinity.

 

But it's an interesting read and I'm glad you found it helpful :) I take it most of it chimed with you? Any bits in particular?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm like Pomona - no divinity but lots of gods ;) And many pagans are apntheist - the whole universe is divine - while others believe in no deities or divine at all. So I think this article only represents one person's POV and shouldn't be held as true for all forms of paganism. :)

 

I'm going to pick out one or two things:

 

 

To a Pagan, divinity is everywhere: in trees, creeks, fields, in the Earth herself.

 

Not universally true, I'm afraid - this is just the belief of some pagans. Perhaps not even the majority of pagans.

 

(It is an interesting irony, though, that modern-day Pagans are almost universally fascinated with computers, science fiction, space travel and colonization, and futurism.)

 

Again, not universally true - though it is of some pagans. But not that many that I know. :)

 

 

"God" comes to us in the nurturing love of the divine mother, as well as in the caring love of the divine father.

 

I have to say that very few pagans see the divine this way IME. This tends to be a christian way of looking at gods.

 

We are not "nature worshippers;" rather, we are people who understand that human beings, far from "having dominion over" nature, are really only one of the many species that are privileged to live on this beautiful planet.

 

Now this, IMO, it closer to a universal for pagans - but, even then, I'd hesitate to assume all pagans agree with it. ;)

 

Pagans are not atheists:

 

Well, some are.

 

I think, on the whole, the article is the POV of one pagan in America. And the American view can be wildly different from the British pagan POV. But there are very, many, ways of seeing the worlkd even among American pagans.

 

If it helps you, hun - that's great. But please don't think it speaks for every - or even most - pagans, because it doesn't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With all of what Moonhunter and Pomona say, I agree ! There is always a place to start and it is good that you have found some ideas which resonate with you! However, I would ask you to keep an open mind, keep reading - Starters Orders has lots of wide and varied information about many different pagan paths, ways and ideas. You will begin to find things that really hit the button for you and then, it is your path, your way and your ideas which will count :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I quite agree that it is just one person's POV and they have made some sweeping generalisations, but as a newcomer to the pagan way of thinking, from a Christian background, it has given me a starting point that I can understand.

 

For example, Divinity. I don't know I agree with that particular term, maybe preferring to call it an "energy" instead, but I can relate to how someone new to the paths and confused about the whole god/goddess thing, or which pantheon is right for them, could take comfort in the understanding that maybe they just hadn't reached that part of their journey yet, rather than worrying that they didn't believe in the gods, while perhaps feeling they ought to.

 

It also affirmed (to me) that if a goddess/god belief/acceptance, never happens, that's ok too, which for me was important, as it was one of the areas in which I was concerned I wasn't "pagan enough"!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just want to put this in: a Pagan can also be a monist & [inclusive] monotheist (which is another label for soft-polytheism) ...

I fear with Paganism we are starting to go down the same path as Christians did, with their endless schisms and saying who's in and who's out...

While I'm fine with putting my own path under the umbrella Pagan (for now), I find that Nature [based] Spirituality is the common factor I'm looking for in relation to other Pagans. (That's just me.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that the article is fine as a general statements of an individual's beliefs, and i can see that it's a useful starting point for some people. Where I take issue with it, is the way that the author seems to be claiming that these are universal, pagan beliefs because they're not. They don't reflect my beliefs for example.

 

I fear with Paganism we are starting to go down the same path as Christians did, with their endless schisms and saying who's in and who's out...

While I'm fine with putting my own path under the umbrella Pagan (for now), I find that Nature [based] Spirituality is the common factor I'm looking for in relation to other Pagans. (That's just me.)

 

I really hope that pagans do not go down that path, for me the great strength of paganism lies in its diversity and tolerance. Thankfully, in my circles I don't see signs that it's happening. There will always be individuals who play that game for their own purposes but I think most pagans see through them pretty quickly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I

I fear with Paganism we are starting to go down the same path as Christians did, with their endless schisms and saying who's in and who's out...

 

 

I think this will always be true of some people in any group - whether pagans or xtians or school children etc - it seems to br the nature of some folk to want to define and label their own ideas and beliefs and then say that others who do not hold the same ideas and beliefs are "out". As Freydis has said, I sincerely hope pagans do not go down that path. It would be against my idea of "paganism" to have any one tell me that what I am and what I believe is either "in" or "out" and I could not care less, actually, either way :)

 

I think it has to do with "control" over others and there are some who have to be in control and, preferably, top of the heap. In human nature, we see such competitiveness in all walks of life !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Moonsmith
      I’ve posted a link (in links) to a BBC article in today’s news just to illustrate a bit of the colourful side of Paganism.  Perhaps it will do something to balance my prosaic take on the subject. i know little of Witchcraft but I enjoyed the article and like her approach.  
    • Ellinas
      👍 It's as good a position as any and better than quite a few.  
    • Stonehugger
      Yes, it was in Nettle's "Who are your deities?" thread. I said "I seem to have become an atheist. That was never my plan, but here I am." Veggiedancer later said it better than me - "I don’t exactly believe in deities as such. I think they come from  our minds. Archetypes, ways of identify or characterising the spirit/ magic/ life or whatever it is we sense around us. Ways our minds try to explain the unexplainable to us???"
    • Moonsmith
      I’m probably second guessing Nettle wrongly but it wasn’t all that long ago that you would have read posts about alters, magic, Shamanism, spells etc. I think it was either Teatimetreat or Drachenfach that had a hex on her handbag and her car.  When the car was stolen it crashed and the thief was caught. I agree and would very much like to see more of the colourful side of Paganism back here.  Quite right Ellinas.  I do not understand how anyone can claim to be Pantheist (or even pantheist) and atheist at the same time even though the most prominent Pantheists do exactly that.  As I’ve said elsewhere: why can’t they call themselves Panists.  The prefix “pan” means everything and everywhere as in “pandemic”.  The god’s name arose from the adjective so it wouldn’t necessarily mean a devotee of Pan. pee ess - it may be worth mentioning that there are a vast number of belief groups under the umbrella word Paganism.  Druids Witches, Polytheist and Shaman are only a small part of what the greater picture of Paganism depicts. Dunno and don’t care are probably the biggest groups.
    • Ellinas
      All the above, plus the impression of a preponderance of atheism is currently, as well as historically, inaccurate.  Certainly, I am no atheist.  I believe MS rejects the term as applicable to himself.  Stonehugger, I think, recently said he had headed in that direction, but I've not seen the other resident atheists for a while. However, our ideas of deity are not the same, necessarily.
×
×
  • Create New...