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Monica Soto

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Books And Stuff


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So.... I've been away on holiday and had a read up on some Pagan stuff!!!

 

I read two books, the first by Mary Neasham called in search of the Green Man and the second, The sacred wheel by Mamma White Cougar.

 

I was quite taken with Mary Neasham's book, the idea of starting down the road by just spending more time getting a feel for what is around you and taking more notice of nature seems to be common sense and so obvious, although the idea of creating a wild space in the garden for fairies to visit is a little out of my league!! (I'd be interested to see if this is a common practice amoungst those on this forum).

 

The sacred wheel was really interesting also. I didn't realise that Greek and Eygptian gods would be a part of Pagan worship (is that the right word?). What I did get out of this book though was the idea of taking more notice of the phases of the moon and also marking the different times of the year such as Yule and Lammas.

 

I have taken steps to slow my lifestyle down and make an effort to step outside for five minutes before bed to see the moon. I'm planning a vegetable patch in the garden (is this even relevant?) and learning to identify trees.

 

What do you think? Any advice?

 

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So.... I've been away on holiday and had a read up on some Pagan stuff!!!

 

I read two books, the first by Mary Neasham called in search of the Green Man and the second, The sacred wheel by Mamma White Cougar.

I was quite taken with Mary Neasham's book, the idea of starting down the road by just spending more time getting a feel for what is around you and taking more notice of nature seems to be common sense and so obvious, although the idea of creating a wild space in the garden for fairies to visit is a little out of my league!! (I'd be interested to see if this is a common practice amoungst those on this forum).

 

I do have a wild space in the garden as it happens. It’s unintentional though :P My approach to gardening is as eclectic as my path – a mix of the formal and meandering :D But yes, I wholeheartedly agree with the idea of just spending time to get a feel for the world around and let that point you in the directions of your path. It’s why I recommend to everyone to sit out under the moon, to stargaze, to sit by a river, the sea, under a tree, on a mossy rock. It’s there that you get connections :) And yes, it is always good to observe the phases of the moon etc, but not every Pagan’s practice revolves around the cycles of the moon and many don’t do anything.

 

 

The sacred wheel was really interesting also. I didn't realise that Greek and Eygptian gods would be a part of Pagan worship (is that the right word?). What I did get out of this book though was the idea of taking more notice of the phases of the moon and also marking the different times of the year such as Yule and Lammas.

 

Well, Pagan worship isn’t a defined “thing” that includes/excludes elements. It’s much more vague, nebulous and intangible. Yes, the Greek and Egyptian gods are honoured and worshipped by many who call themselves Pagan, as are deities from all around the world. So Paganism isn’t restricted to any particular pantheon and not every Pagan even believes in gods. Not sure what you mean about the sacred wheel – do you mean like the year is a wheel that constantly turns, kind of idea? Yule and Lammas are both lovely festivals, I know a lot of people do mark them, and also, depending on their path, mark other times besides the ones you’ll have read about as being part of the wheel of the year.

 

I have taken steps to slow my lifestyle down and make an effort to step outside for five minutes before bed to see the moon. I'm planning a vegetable patch in the garden (is this even relevant?) and learning to identify trees.

 

 

Planting veg? Hel yeah! Growing my own food is a HUGE part of my path – it’s not part of everyone else’s and that’s fine, but it connects me intimately to the earth, to the seasons, to the cycle of weather, I think it, and gardening generally, are a fantastic and meaningful way to build a relationship with the earth and the gods. It does help you slow down, and, if you have a generally stressful life (who doesn’t?) then it’s a wonderfully therapeutic activity that does slow down the mind and takes it off the train tracks of worry.

 

It’s a great path, an amazing journey – and the discovery of who and what you are as you meander along it is a life-enhancing experience, in my mind :D

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Hi Pomona

 

I think Momma W C was referring to the sacred wheel as the cycle of the year, observing these special times keeps you in tune with nature, as to how to mark these occasions is something I need to consider.

 

I feel comfortable and at home with what I've taken from both books and this is the starting point for what I hope will be a long journey!!

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