Jump to content
Monica Soto

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

The Power Of Places


Roots
 Share

Recommended Posts

There are two very special and very beautiful places that I have spent my whole life visiting - I return to them often. Both have open spaces and very old woods, high places and low spaces, water and air. Both have ancient history.

Both have always felt like they have a power and a presence far beyond my understanding. As a boy, the happiest times were often there. In latter years when times are good, I take my family to share in the joy and wonder of them. When I am troubled I visit alone and i find peace. It angers and saddens me in equal measure when I see these beautiful places abused by the others that visit them.

 

I'd like to do more - to connect, to learn, to venerate, to enjoy them even more for the rest of my life - but how?

I'd love to hear your suggestions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

To be honest I'm not sure I can really suggest anything more than you already do: go there, experience it, give thanks to the wights for the peace you find there. I don't know if you've read Emma Restall Orr's Druid Priestess but she describes her feelings about her grove in the way that you do, and her connection with it is deepened by her spending time there, becoming part of it, feeling it, understanding the energies around it etc. I think the essence of it all is just simply going there and spending time in it - the rest will flow.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could try learning the ecology of the place, what plants and other creatures live there? I find that you notice things more when you have something to call them.Learn about the soil and the rainfall and the human history of the place. So it's not chanting in the moonlight and waiting for the numinous but tbh I think it's worth simply having some basic academic knowledge of a place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

When I go to my special places, I always take a bag with me to carry away any rubbish that selfish people have left there.

 

But the other side of this is that I take my own things to leave there. Nothing that anyone else would notice. Semi-precious stones, small things I have made out of twigs and leaves from my garden. And I bring back similar things to put in my garden. So there is a bit of the place around my garden altar, and something from my garden there. It all helps to build up a relationship with places where I go to meditate and be with the spirits of the places. So the places can live in my mind even when I am elsewhere.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

To be honest I'm not sure I can really suggest anything more than you already do: go there, experience it, give thanks to the wights for the peace you find there. I don't know if you've read Emma Restall Orr's Druid Priestess but she describes her feelings about her grove in the way that you do, and her connection with it is deepened by her spending time there, becoming part of it, feeling it, understanding the energies around it etc. I think the essence of it all is just simply going there and spending time in it - the rest will flow.

 

Based on your response, I'm just waiting on delivery of 'Druid Priestess' right now, Pom! Got it second hand on Amazon for a fiver - a little Yule pressie pour moi.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a specifically pagan book but have you ever read The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd? Wonderful book on the power of place, beautifully written. It's specifically about the Cairngorns but the awareness translates to anywhere, I think.

 

Also really really (really) recommend Robert Macfarlane in general. Here's a lovely interview with him to give you a sense: http://thebrowser.com/interviews/robert-macfarlane-on-wild-places

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Aranya thank you very much for the recommendations and the link - loved the interview and definitely following up on many of the books introduced.

 

I've had some great walks through the cairngorns and the lake district but then I've also always been intrigued by the ancient pathways that spread across Britain. I seem to have spent much of my years very close to or travelling the same journeys as the Peddars Way. So Roberts trilogy looks to have me enthralled for a couple of months I'd say........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree and love what others have already suggested here. When I feel connected to a place, I love to find out more about it by researching it. I also love spending time being there, and I'll sometimes take a notebook to write, or a sketchbook to draw. I find that being inspired by something is the most divine experience I can sometimes have. And sometimes, the place speaks through my works and I write or draw things I never would have created on my own. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I open myself up to connect to the wights of the place.

 

This is brilliant, I've been toying with the idea of posting something very similar - love this forum :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Moonsmith
      I’ve posted a link (in links) to a BBC article in today’s news just to illustrate a bit of the colourful side of Paganism.  Perhaps it will do something to balance my prosaic take on the subject. i know little of Witchcraft but I enjoyed the article and like her approach.  
    • Ellinas
      👍 It's as good a position as any and better than quite a few.  
    • Stonehugger
      Yes, it was in Nettle's "Who are your deities?" thread. I said "I seem to have become an atheist. That was never my plan, but here I am." Veggiedancer later said it better than me - "I don’t exactly believe in deities as such. I think they come from  our minds. Archetypes, ways of identify or characterising the spirit/ magic/ life or whatever it is we sense around us. Ways our minds try to explain the unexplainable to us???"
    • Moonsmith
      I’m probably second guessing Nettle wrongly but it wasn’t all that long ago that you would have read posts about alters, magic, Shamanism, spells etc. I think it was either Teatimetreat or Drachenfach that had a hex on her handbag and her car.  When the car was stolen it crashed and the thief was caught. I agree and would very much like to see more of the colourful side of Paganism back here.  Quite right Ellinas.  I do not understand how anyone can claim to be Pantheist (or even pantheist) and atheist at the same time even though the most prominent Pantheists do exactly that.  As I’ve said elsewhere: why can’t they call themselves Panists.  The prefix “pan” means everything and everywhere as in “pandemic”.  The god’s name arose from the adjective so it wouldn’t necessarily mean a devotee of Pan. pee ess - it may be worth mentioning that there are a vast number of belief groups under the umbrella word Paganism.  Druids Witches, Polytheist and Shaman are only a small part of what the greater picture of Paganism depicts. Dunno and don’t care are probably the biggest groups.
    • Ellinas
      All the above, plus the impression of a preponderance of atheism is currently, as well as historically, inaccurate.  Certainly, I am no atheist.  I believe MS rejects the term as applicable to himself.  Stonehugger, I think, recently said he had headed in that direction, but I've not seen the other resident atheists for a while. However, our ideas of deity are not the same, necessarily.
×
×
  • Create New...