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Doretta Lowe

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Nature Side Of Being A Pagan


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Hello

First i want to apologize if I'm naive i have got it wrong completely...

 

I am a newbie.

 

But i have always been drawn to nature and i feel becoming more pagan shall help this more.

 

So becoming pagan where it involves nature

 

where shall i start?

 

Thanks for reading :)

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How do you feel becoming a Pagan will help this more hun? I wonder if you’re thinking that one has to do something to become a Pagan but the simple answer is: if you self-identify as a Pagan, then you’re a Pagan. So your question, more properly should be, as a Pagan, how can I learn more about my place within Nature and strengthen my connection? Well – you are part of nature. Everything you do and everything you see is part of it. Only you can answer what part of nature you feel most drawn to and why. So perhaps you might like to go and sit by the riverbank, or beach, or under a starry sky, or in a garden, and think about what you feel when you’re there. If you want to help nature, then consider going on litter-picking expeditions, volunteer at a local wildlife sanctuary, protest against badger culling etc etc.

 

It’s really up to you to decide how you want to interact with nature but because nature encompasses so much, start small and think about specific elements of it that you want to explore more. :)

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i always said being a pagan is being part of nature. Many assume being part of nature and a pagan make you a dont tread on the grass being it may cause it pain hug trees hippy type person. Of course some are like that.

Its always the question where do i start. I think the answer should be dont start anywhere. If you feel drawn to aspects of nature and understand the balance it gives without being governed by who made it. you are already a pagan so well done.

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A core part of my Paganism is the acknowledgement of the ubiquity of nature. It is everything, it is us. Nothing we or anyone or thing else does can be unnatural or "against nature". Can't imagine getting much closer to nature than that.

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Well, first of all there's no "pagan nature rule book", but I would start close to home. Sit in a garden, or a park. Go for a walk - even if it's in the middle of the city it's still nature. Think about what it means to you - what comes into your mind when you think "nature"? What do you want to do that makes you feel closer and more connected maybe? There's no right and wrong way of doing this, it's very personal. :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

A reverence for nature doesn't mean you should become Pagan - you can revere anything without subscribing to any belief system - but if you feel, like I do (I am new to this forum and to Paganism too), that you have more than just an appreciation for nature and more of an affinity - a need to connect with it on a more spiritual basis - maybe a Pagan following is right for you (and me!).

 

You could try inviting nature into your home? I love collecting bits and bobs from the seaside, or having plants or flowers in the house. Look into the conditions plants thrive in before getting them, though otherwise they'll die. Christmas Cacti are pretty, unusual alternatives to typical festive plants.

Growing things makes me really happy too - you could try sowing some stuff ready for Spring or something like that?

 

Try to get out into nature more too - just by noticing it everywhere you go.

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Following on from Kitten's excellent advice, this time of year is perfect to start planning if you do want to grow things. If you want Spring bulbs next year, Oct-Dec is the right time to plant them. I tend to grow mostly functional plants, so this is the time when I clear out my pots of dead plants, cut everything back, store the dead twigs and branches in bundles in areas where insects and small animals can benefit, and generally start getting everything ready for my seedlings in Spring. I trimmed my rose back to the stump this week, although it still had a LOT of flowers on it, so the green and spiky flowering stems are going to be tied into attractive shapes and used as decoration while they're still good. Although I expect my cat Looshkin will eat the flowers before too long.

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Oops, a bit too late to edit. I also wanted to mention you can get in touch with the fauna as well as the flora. I've been baking lots of nice, wholegrain seeded loaves, and when the leftovers and crusts go stale I've been breaking them into chunks, mixing with dried fruit and suet leftover from making my mincemeat for minced pies, and setting the mixture in a muffin tray with some string inserted. Hang them outside once cool. Blue tits, wagtails and robins have been coming into my garden en-mass this Autumn. Sadly, my bee shelter got colonised by spiders, so no bees using my garden this year. I might make some small cob structures next year - certain types of bees love to burrow in the stuff.

Edited by BunnyMazonas
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