Jump to content
Haylee Linton

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online. Become a Patron!

Samhain Decorating


Guest Tyla.G
 Share

Recommended Posts

I know its early, but i reaaaly want to start decorating for Samhain!

This is going to be my first Sabbat where i will be celebrating with rituals and meditation, so i want to make everything perfect!

I have noticed in the uk we have a lack of, well... every thing for halloween/samhain..

The only places ive seen with anything actually nice is Asda and Wilkos, or is that because its a bit early for everyone?

where do you all suggest I get stuff from?

also if anyone has any tips on celebrating Samhain I would greatly appreciate it :D

Blessed be <3 x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please consider supporting us to help keep our Website and Facebook groups online.

Love the picture! :)

 

and i want to be creative, its just where to start! lol :)

 

do you know any shops or online stores that sell good halloween/samhain stuff?

xx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can get lovely items in craft shops and sometimes even the pound shops or odd items from charity shops. The Pagan shop in Bletchley Agora is lovely and I'm sure would give advice... I think its about personal feeling and the colours you are drawn to, I'm just picking up stuff as I go for walks and bringing the outside in.

 

x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive been to the one in bletchley agora, its got nice things but I was abit concerned when she didnt have a clue about the pendulums she sold :\ xx

 

Im having a gander in local charity shops tomorrow, also hopefully going bow brickhill later in the week :D x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decorate with gourds and things I find. This year I have made a hop wreath from wild hops I cut from a rather overwhelmed hawthorn. Strings of Rowan berries look great as well as dried seed heads etc. I don't buy the commercialised stuff for the hallowe'en market.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't buy the commercialised stuff for the hallowe'en market.

 

Damn right! None of this pumpkin nonsense - red leaf garlands, turnip lanterns, fir boughs, skulls, white horses, apples and nuts.

 

Mind you, if you want to hollow out a turnip for a lantern you will have to be starting soon...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to admit that I do indulge in buying a pumpkin or two (carnt help it just love carving them).....but everything else I use to decorate the place, is sourced from the well stocked local larder of mother earth....Conkers, berries, different varieties of apples, conifer cones etc...

 

Its each to their own though....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't do the Halloween stuff ! We have a Samhain Sabbat ritual when we decorate our altar with all things natural from the country and / or the garden - this year later than the calendar Halloween. The Hairy Momster likes to carve a pumpkin (hasn't the patience for a turnip :) ) which we light with a candle and place at the bottom of the drive near the gate!

 

The ritual is serious stuff and probably the most important for us from the whole Wheel of the Year, when the veil between the worlds is thin and those who have gone before are invited to return and dwell with us a while .........

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me there's nothing better than a string of turnip lanterns, their little pixie faces glowing in the dark :)

 

. . . along with the smell of roasting turnip, lol

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't decorate for Samhain, but I think the natural world is just full of lovely stuff to do so rather than the plastic garish tat you find in the shops. Go for berries, hops, ornamental squashes, bowls of nuts. Interesting finds of wood, tons of red and gold leaves scattered around. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I've been very green this year and I'm currently looking out of my study window at a very large pumpkin I've grown specially! I agree, forget the shops. Nature gives everything you need to celebrate this time of year....... and the World will be just a bit happier with less crap coming here in container ships from China.

 

And to all you masochists who insist on hollowing out turnips and swedes..... why? Pumpkins obviously want to be turned into lanterns, and you won't have to count all your fingers to check they're still there after removing the seeds!

 

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And to all you masochists who insist on hollowing out turnips and swedes..... why?

 

When you have the right tools, why not?

 

i5d5ae.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK Badger Bob - you may have just convinced me to try and make a turnip lantern. I can certainly understand why pumpkins became the popular choice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not really big on ritual and altars and things, because that's just my path and I don't like to veer to far off of it but saying that, I do have like an altar-like table where I do my herby workings and normally at samhain I set it up with pictures of my loved ones who have passed, with a candle for each of them. And then I decorate the table with stuff that I have gathered such as leaves, bits of woods, foraged fruits and I do normally buy a bunch of autumnal flowers (fingers crossed for sunflowers!). I also light a shed load of candles around the house, normally black and orange. I managed to find some plastic grapes and garlands and things, which I will put up around the house - but around my herby table I keep it natural.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will be doing a wee Samhain ritual, and having some Halloween fun with the LOs. :coz_witch:

 

I will get a pumpkin, well two, since I don't have a power tool like Badger Bob. I will scour the net looking for just the right template that the LOs will appreciate, and have one pumpkin tradtionaly carved, and the other cute.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dear Badger Bob,

 

Mind you, if you want to hollow out a turnip for a lantern you will have to be starting soon...

 

While I'm strongly of the view that spending hours bending spoons and making your fingers bleed is good for building character, I have to confess that using one of those stubby, thick handled, shovel-type, ice-cream scoops to hollow out your neep speeds things up dramatically.

 

BB,

 

John Macintyre

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

When I was a kid we used to hollow out swedes for jack o' lanterns. Now that was some rough going. I'd have to start it right after school if I wanted it ready to light by 7 or 8 o'clock, lol ;D

 

Edited by Isrith
Link to comment
Share on other sites

These were our pumpkins this year! Had lots of fun at a pick your own pumpkin farm before carving them. Still eating pumpkin soup now! :-)

 

Oops did attach properly. Here...

 

Dunno why it's sideways now. Doh.

post-131565-0-58844700-1415051055_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Nettle
      I have only ever been a Christian on paper lol. When visiting hospitals I would give the CofE answer when asked about my beliefs. I didn‚Äôt really even know what it meant. As a child I often prayed to God. But could probably count on two hands the amount of times I have attended church. Obviously at school I sang hymns¬†and recited the Lord‚Äôs Prayer. But I never went deep into it. My family is not religious. I have never been deeply influenced by Christianity. I have always been spiritual though. The weirdest thing is when I started on this journey it actually allowed me to gain deeper understanding of the Christ spirit. For many years I sought a shamanic technique¬†called the ‚Äúfierce eye‚Ä̬†technique. This technique as I believed at the time would allow me to command any spirit. I could banish them or destroy them at a glance. My long search for this technique allowed me to find and connect with many interesting things but never allowed me to unravel¬†the mysteries of the fierce eye technique. One day I had vision. In the vision - between the two doors - I saw a man standing at the corner of a street near to where I live. It was daytime but there was nothing else around. Nothing moved. It was as if every living thing was¬†asleep. I approached the man who as I was drawing closer turned to regard my approach. What I saw blew my mind away. The love I felt emanating from this strangers eyes was so powerful, so all consuming, utterly accepting¬†that I fell to my knees and started weeping with happiness. The love was so unconditional, so total and all encompassing. It took my breath away. I eventually awakened from this vision thinking what the hell was that all about? I did not realise until later that I had been shown the ‚Äúfierce eye‚ÄĚ technique. I had been mistaken in my assumptions as to what the ‚Äúfierce eye‚Ä̬†technique was all about. It was not about destroying something,¬†Commanding something¬†or even banishing something. It‚Äôs power lies in acceptance. I later realised that the being I had seen in my vision was the Christ spirit. The Christ spirit is also a Great Fool.¬† Who would have believed it,¬†that I would find¬†Christ following a pagan path lol. The irony was fitting. And made me realise just how limited I had allowed myself to be. The few times I have gone to church recently since this experience¬†(my son used to attend a CofE school) I feel very happy. Overjoyed even. A little mischievous.¬†I know I am welcome there even though I do not take up the mantle of Christian. I feel at home, accepted, even though I am a pagan. I feel very¬†welcome within the church.
    • Nettle
      I have several. Stone rabbit is one of my guides. He is a stone around the size of a medium sized hand, that is in the shape of a rabbits head (in profile) that I found many years ago and kept. On one side he has a mark that looks like an open eye, on the other side it looks as if he has lost that eye. Stone rabbit is master at navigating mazes/webways. When I want him to see something within the mundane I turn his head so his eye can observe. If I am going on a journey I have his lost eye side observing. He comes on my walks with me and I carry him in a bag around my neck.
    • Roundtuit
      Thank you.  Yes, I'm starting to think it's the journey that matters.   What a gorgeous image!  I'd love to get back to the fells, there's something new around very corner there.    
    • Stonehugger
      I've had varying degrees and natures of commitment to Christianity since I was at school but I've also always had pagan leanings and for quite a long time now my path has been entirely pagan. It's unproblematic in that my family and friends think it's harmless eccentricity, but I imagine it would be different if I took a strongly pagan stance on something. For me personally it's important to listen to what's going on around me and work out my path accordingly, so I celebrate the presence of many paths up the same mountain and have no concerns about reaching the top. I imagine that, like almost any walk in the fells, what currently looks like the top is just another place to see the next top from. Definitely!! ūüėĀ
    • Ellinas
      Well, I've been called many things in my time... I'm also a former Christian, with a chequered history (Anglican, in the guise of the Church in Wales, then Plymouth Brethren with the odd foray into the Baptists along the way).  I fell out with Christianity in the early 2000's, when I was late 30's, early 40's. Since then, the general nature of my meanderings has remained fairly constant, but the details and contents have changed over time.  That's fine.  The journey is the issue, not the destination.  Ithaca calls, but Phoenician markets and Egyptian cities have the greater import (poetic reference - just means follow your path and hope to arrive late, if at all).  What I believe tomorrow may be very different to what I believe today.  What I believed yesterday is just a stepping stone. In short, don't worry about what you have been, as it is merely the pathway that got you to what you are, and don't worry about where you are going, there are any number of bye-ways for you to explore. As to others - I have struggled with family pressures and the tyranny of monotheistic faith.  I understand your position and have no issue with a softly-softly approach such as you describe.  In fact, it is the best way unless you are prepared to create and weather a family rift. Dangerous statement.  Talk about tempting fate...!
×
×
  • Create New...