Jump to content
Galaemar Laerareon

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

The Magick Shop
Please consider visiting our kind sponsor: The Magick Shop
Sign in to follow this  
fizzyclare1

Fire Gazing, Consciousness And Meditations

Recommended Posts

fizzyclare1

I got to thinking about a post I made in the 'halloween' thread.

 

One of the things I do during this time (and when I feel like it) is imagine myself gazing into a fire as a means to relax, stoke my imagination and just generally be creative. When I get the chance, I like to firegaze into a real fire say, on bonfire night or a log fire or something.

 

I adapted this practice from a book i read a long time ago, where it was argued that perhaps, earlier societies and primitive societies used the practice of firegazing. I will add that this was speculation.

 

Do any of you fire gaze in the way I have suggested, or for any other purpose? Is fire involved in any of your practices? if so what do you do? Does fire signify or mean anything special to you?

 

Sent from my Lenovo A7600-F using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ad from Google

Guest Suluffman

Hi there! I don't have a log fire any more as I have moved but yes I used to gaze at lot at the fire and watch the embers rise and fall in their heat. It relaxed me a great deal and with practice I could eventually make out what I thought were pictures, faces, my grandmother was very good at this, she would say to me as a young child, look there Su can you see that horse there, and look there's the face of ...so and so she could see plenty! I think it's an ancient art, a form of meditation perhaps. I was born under the fire sign and love the Sun, but I haven't used it in any practices, yet, just a candle for path working.

Happy Samhain xx

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

it crops up in childrens literature too. One of my favourite childhood books during junior school was the lion the witch and the wardrobe. More often it is common to critique the book and analyse the christian influences. But there is a delightful scene where Lucy, upon meeting Mr Tumnus, goes to his little house and there he uses music, herbs to bewitch lucy (maybe not so delightful then!) and send her to sleep but during this process, the film makers produced special effects to make small creatures appear as if by magic!

 

the moral question in connection with kidnapping and drugging aside, I thought that the fire shot was really well done.

 

Mr tumnus really does have alot to answer for doesnt he!

 

Sent from my Lenovo A7600-F using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

i've often wondered about the use of candles in practice, I know some use then to signify the points of a compass or maybe to signify the change in seasons/the wheel of the year. I know when I light a candle you get a lovely warm glow thats very relaxing but i dont think thats its purpose here.

 

Sent from my Lenovo A7600-F using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ellinas

Never done it myself. Ultimately, it seems to me just a another meditative technique to achieve some form of trance state, to free the mind and the imagination so it can work free of the white noise of everyday life.

 

Whatever works for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

I love watching a fire, and the embers glowing and flaring up.

I also like candles too but they aren't the same.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

I agree the flame of a candle is too small.

 

Am looking forward to bonfire night tbh

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moonhunter

There is a scrying technique involving a candle (often with the help of a reflective surface). And for meditation. I wouldn't be surprised if fire was used by people in the past to induce trance state.

 

I live in a fireless house, though I was brought up with fire. For us, fire was the only means of warming the house, as we had no central heating. I grew up a servant of Cen - the household fire that gives warmth and light and hot food. Because we lived in a wonderful age of matches and firelighters, who had no need of the all-important tinderbox and charcloth of past ages. We had no ritual of keeping the fire alight. We did not associate ill-luck with a fire going out. We cooked with a controlled flame. But the fascination of fire remains, and I love a bonfire or a firepit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

Who or what is 'cen'? It's also a whole new word as well for me, :D

 

Is it short for something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moonhunter

oh, sorry, Fizz. It's a rune. Mind must have gone awol. It's one of those runes whose meaning differs across the rune poems (i.e. it had different meanings in different countries.) I take the Anglo Saxon, hence using that spelling for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

Aaaah! Now I know, thank you. V. Interesting link.

 

I've never heard of a rune poem, I'll have to look it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

I've only lived in a house with an open fire place for a year. But it just seems built into out psyche that it is an important place. It seems a ritual place. As well as just watching the mesmerising fire, If I want to make a wish or clarify my intensions I sometimes burn a note and send them up the chimney with the smoke. I have on occasions left little offerings in the fireplace. Even when we don't light a fire I often light candles in the fire place. And the mantle piece is perfect for leaving nice stones or shells or feathers if I find something. Or things that seem important, that mean something at the time. My fireplace is probably the nearest thing I have to an alter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isrith

My mother taught us all to fire gaze when we were kids, with the intent of bringing on prophecy or at least to look for symbols that could explain current circumstances and how to move forward ,

 

Edited by Isrith
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hazel

When I was growing up our home had an open coal fire. Coming from a mining town an open fire was something everyone had and used. When I was very young I used to have a bath in front of the fire, we use to cook chestnuts collected from the local wood on it, dry clothes and once when the town had no electricity for two weeks one winter because of snow fall we used it for both warmth and the only light source in the house. When I started my first job as a kennel maid we use to collect paper used in the kennels, take it down to the field and burn it. It was quite something really to have a big bonfire out in a big open space every morning, not that I thought that way at the time.

 

I do love an open fire, it is very relaxing and trance inducing and at one time very a practical thing to have.

Edited by Hazel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

Does firegazing feel 'pagan' to you personally? If so, what makes firegazing pagan (or not).

 

Question to all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ellinas

I'm not sure what the idea of "feeling pagan" involves.

 

It feels a tad warm if you get close enough...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

It feels like a link with my ancestors who have gazed at the flames before me. And also like a link with everyone all over the world also doing it. It feels really natural and human and primal. And it definitely inspires a sense of awe. So yep I'm gonna say it feels pagan to me Because those kind of feelings, you could say, inspire paganism in me. But then maybe for someone else it would inspire belief in something else. It feels really universal. I don't think it is only pagans who enjoy a fire like I do.

But sometimes I think everyone is pagan they just don't know it ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Freydis

I love fires. We don't have an open fire where we live at the moment, but I love to watch fires and bonfires. I've never used fire for scrying myself, but I know that people do and I can well believe it can be used to induce a trance state. I wouldn't say that it feels particularly pagan to me, although it certainly doesn't feel not pagan (if that makes any sense).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

It's not the fire itself that makes it feel pagan to me, nor is it the act of meditation, cos you don't have to be pagan to meditate.

 

What feels pagan to me is the content of what happens when I firegaze. It's like I'm rummaging around my own psyche, finding the things that are not usually on my daily agenda. Like the earth, nourishment, my loved ones who have passed and a celebration and contemplation of life.

 

It feels profoundly spiritual and although I find myself not accepting the concept of the 'divine' its the closest I'll probably ever get to it.

 

If course not all of this is directly connected to firegazing, it is part of a whole and I am left thankful for my existence. It gives me hope, i think.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

Well said fizz! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fizzyclare1

Lol, thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isrith

To me, fire-gazing is neither pagan, nor is it non-pagan. It is more a way of entering an altered state, a shift in consciousness that allows information to come through. The fire/embers physically interact with the body in that we feel the heat, see living colour, smell the fuel, hear the burn, watch it change. It is an all encompassing experience that wraps around and draws you in, thereby helping awareness to deepen and intensify. In such a state the mind freely opens.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pearlbrook

Sad I missed this thread the first time around.

 

Fire gazing is actually one of the types of mindfulness that mental health professionals recommend. It's also one that I personally find quite accessible as someone who has a problem meditating. There's something about a flame that is calming and hypnotic, and I find it always creates a warm feeling even if you are too far away from it to actually experience the physical heat being released from the combustion.

 

I also have a special relationship with fire through Hestia, and find this adds another layer of comfort and fascination. In myth, Hestia tends the hearth of the house of the gods at Olympus and her name is actually synonymous with hearth. According to my study, in ancient times houses were designed and built around the central hearth and Hestia had pride of place at all meals, always being offered the first of the food. The Romans had a very similar relationship with their goddess Vesta. And as someone has already mentioned, the hearth fire going out usually signalled disaster as it should only be allowed to extinguish as a result of the break up of the household, the end of the family etc etc.

 

Of course, nowadays it's very difficult to keep a flame burning 24/7 and so I've had to adapt my practice. For a while now the flame of Hestia hasn't shone in my home at all, but today for the first time she is burning and in a way I can't describe the house feels like it has a soul again. My eye is being drawn to the flame often.

 

But I've never been able to use fire gazing as a method of scrying or any kind of magic or mystical practice and I'd love to hear more about the techniques and results people have had for this. I came to the conclusion long ago that I'm just not naturally inclined towards being good at magic or scrying, but it's something I'd like to work on or at least learn more about.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ellinas

I suppose the boiler in the utility room has a constant flame - albeit I'd need to gaze at it whilst standing in front of the washing machine and leaning forward at a rather uncomfortable angle.

 

Personally, I find the action of the waves or the patterns of the wind in grass or leaves have the same sort of relaxing and vaguely hypnotic effect.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phototoxin

Fire is quite relaxing for me. I grew up in a house which had a fire lit most days except perhaps the hottest summer days. The smell of a wood\coal fire smelled different to a natural gas flame (on the cooker).

The main fire heated our radiator water too so was an essential part of keepinwarm in winter!

Also around now, when the nights start drawing in we'd get some turf (bog pete) to burn too. It was always dusty but earthy and long lasting.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moonsmith

I suppose the boiler in the utility room has a constant flame - albeit I'd need to gaze at it whilst standing in front of the washing machine and leaning forward at a rather uncomfortable angle.

 

Personally, I find the action of the waves or the patterns of the wind in grass or leaves have the same sort of relaxing and vaguely hypnotic effect.

 

I love fire gazing. I think BV and Eth posted some images of our fire in the lakes from a few years ago.

 

Like Ellinas I enjoy gazing at any "random" shifting image. Fire certainly because I'm usually in my natural setting, comfortable and fed! But yes, waves, dappled shadows in woodland, candle smoke, cloudscapes and that fascination with bird flocks and fish shoals. I can even get a quick fix from things like the image generator that used to come with Windows Media or those 1980's lightning balls.

 

I'd guess that it is something that has an ever changing innate beauty, is random and outside our control so that anything that we visualise or that is borne in on us as a result might be a way of accessing our subconscious thinking or problem solving faculties.

 

Edited to add - not Pagan, just human.

Edited by Moonsmith
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...