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The Hare


Guest fizzyclare1
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does the hare signify in your beliefs or faith?

 

I like the hare, have done for a long time, I can't really explain why but it is a perennial favourite of mine.

 

I used to love to see the hares scampering about in some of the fields near where I live, they were always more active around spring. I guess its the mating season in action.

 

I also bought a necklace with a hare on it and I frequently use it wallpapers for my tablet etc.

 

I find it very calming, and yes i think it does connect with my spiritual beliefs, it definitely connects with my psychologically speaking too.

 

So any of you find the hare appealing?

 

What does it mean for you in your beliefs?

 

Sent from my Lenovo A7600-F using Tapatalk

 

 

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Well in East Anglia, the hare is a special animal - there aren't many accounts but those that do exist say that the hare was an animal associated with Andraste - the Iceni goddess of war. Whether that is absolute fact or not I'm not certain - but I do know that white hares do make me smile. Not that I feel a particular connection to Andraste - my link is much stronger with Odin, Thor and Vidar :)

 

It's a good point to raise though, I don't know what others will think but that is my opinion and thoughts on the matter. :)

 

WH Fizzyclare :)

Edited by ShadowWalker
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Dear Fizzyclare,

 

Yes, I love watching hares in the fields around us. They are one of those creatures that seem to be imbued with a mystical as well as a physical presence. One of the many living beings that makes the landscape a religious, as well as a material, presence for me.

 

Boudicca is said to have released one between the armies before giving battle to the Romans, though sadly it didn't do her much good.

 

That great English singer, Maddy Prior, recently* released a truly wonderful song, "The Fabled Hare", on her magnificent "Year" album, inspired by, and partly derived from, a shape-changing spell in the records of the trial of Isobel Gowdie in Scotland in the mid-17th Century:

 

"I sall go intill a hare

Wi sorrow, sich and mickle care;....."

 

It still makes the hairs stand up on the back of my neck.

 

So yes, hares are awesome.

 

BB,

 

John Macintyre

 

* I know, I know, some of you will no doubt claim that it cannot be recent as you were not born when it came out, but I swear by both the grey hares of the fields and the grey hairs of my beard that it's still RECENT!

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Yeah, there's definitely something about hares. They do seem to be that bit more otherworldly than other animals, a bit more fey. In Roman traditions they were associated with deities of love: Cupid and Venus. I don't actually associate them with love, but more with the moon and think the imagery of moongazing hares absolutely beautiful. As well as venerating them on a magickal level, I also support the Hare Preservaton Trust, who do marvellous work raising awareness about and support for these beautiful animals. They're also an animal I refuse to eat.

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I don't know about religious significance, but they certainly evoke something deep in me. The sight of hares in the morning sparks my imagination in the same way that crows in a wood do, or herons stalking their way through the reeds at the edge of a lake when it is misty. I don't know why, but they put me mind of the antiquity of the land we live in and make me conscious of the line of ancestors standing behind me.

 

Mike

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I'll eat rabbits but - like Pomona - not hares. For me, they are a semi-magical animal. Oddly, they don't feature at all in the heathen texts we have. I suspect that might be because most of what we have comes from iceland. The documents from Germany, England and other Heathen countries are largely lost. I wouldn't be at all surprised to have seen in them associations between a goddess and hares. My bet would be on Hretha or Freyja.

 

Amusingly, I took part recently in a ritual that held meaning and power for me. Afterwards, someone gave me something with an image of a hare, in connection with the ritual. I began to understand why the hare jewellery I had made, many years ago, never wanted to leave me; though neither did it seem to wish to be used. I suspect I'll be wearing it, now.

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I once ate jugged hare. I regret it. And not just because it's gross.

 

They don't currently play a role, but since I love watching them, running, boxing, their different stances, the fact they are like a cross between a rabbit and a small deer, they no doubt will do in time. Fox and deer already do. I hope in time to come across the skull of each and sanctify it for their respective 'god' spirits as commemoration, dyeing and etc to beautify them. Until I find a reason, no, but I won't make one up.

Edited by Briton
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They have no meaning for me in terms of my beliefs, but they're beautiful animals and I love to watch them. I don't think that I ever have eaten hare, but that's down to lack of opportunity. I probably would eat one if it was offered, but I tend not to differentiate between animals I'll eat on spiritual grounds.

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They have no meaning for me in terms of my beliefs, but they're beautiful animals and I love to watch them. I don't think that I ever have eaten hare, but that's down to lack of opportunity. I probably would eat one if it was offered, but I tend not to differentiate between animals I'll eat on spiritual grounds.

 

I would really, really recommend against it. It is so unbearably lean and dry. It's like old, overcooked school dinner liver. No amount of gravy I had with it achieved anything. Rabbit on the other hand is delicious.

 

However I know curiosity is strong so I would just say if you have it, don't pay for it.

Edited by Briton
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I stopped eating Hare in the mid 1970's for my own personal reasons, one of which was because the decline in their numbers was quite noticable where I was living then. The Hare Preservation Trust say that " the Brown Hare has declined 80% in the past 100 years and the decline is on going." This animal is quite special in the countryside, which will not be the same without it there. See http://www.hare-preservation-trust.co.uk/status.php

There seems to be a natural beauty and grace to a Hare running at full speed, its also quite magical to see one seemingly disappear in the middle of a flat wide open field. I think that it should have a closed season where it cannot be shot or taken by any method to help in its conservation, but, asking for complete protection will be difficult in areas where root crops, sugar beet and the like, are grown, as Hares do quite a bit of damage. But something has to be done soon or this magical creature will vanish from our countryside.

Edited by Wolfwind
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They have no meaning for me in terms of my beliefs, but they're beautiful animals and I love to watch them. I don't think that I ever have eaten hare, but that's down to lack of opportunity. I probably would eat one if it was offered, but I tend not to differentiate between animals I'll eat on spiritual grounds.
I would really, really recommend against it. It is so unbearably lean and dry. It's like old, overcooked school dinner liver. No amount of gravy I had with it achieved anything. Rabbit on the other hand is delicious. However I know curiosity is strong so I would just say if you have it, don't pay for it.

 

In that case I won't go out of my way to try it! I can imagine that it's a bit like an elderly game bird - very gamey and tough.

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I'm really like hares and rabbits, there is something other worldly about them. I love the book watership down (yes I know its about rabbits and not hares but they are very close in my mind), in fact its why i picked the name Hazel after the main character. One of the things a love most about the book is the story of el ahrairah and of how rabbits (and hares) came into being. I also love artwork of hares that you see quite often these days. Thinking about it, because I have always loved that story and been drawn to the hare since a young age it can be seen as a bit of a power animal for me.

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I stopped eating Hare in the mid 1970's for my own personal reasons, one of which was because the decline in their numbers was quite noticable where I was living then. The Hare Preservation Trust say that " the Brown Hare has declined 80% in the past 100 years and the decline is on going." This animal is quite special in the countryside, which will not be the same without it there. See http://www.hare-preservation-trust.co.uk/status.php

There seems to be a natural beauty and grace to a Hare running at full speed, its also quite magical to see one seemingly disappear in the middle of a flat wide open field. I think that it should have a closed season where it cannot be shot or taken by any method to help in its conservation, but, asking for complete protection will be difficult in areas where root crops, sugar beet and the like, are grown, as Hares do quite a bit of damage. But something has to be done soon or this magical creature will vanish from our countryside.

 

I don't think I've ever seen a hare, or perhaps not since I was a kid and thought it was a rabbit. Just read the info you posted Wolfwind ! The plight of hares is one you don't hear much about unfortunately. I hope the little patch of wildflower meadow we planted becomes helpful to some hares in the area.

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  • 1 month later...

Hares are one of my favourite animals. I am lucky in that the other half is a farmer and I get to see loads out in the fields.

I especially like it when we come across the leverets - they are so cute and such independent little souls - being left in a scrape In the field and only visited by mum every couple of hours for a feed. The unfortunate thing here is that the local population is being decimated by Red Kites - I have seen them taking leverets off the field - its so sad.

I always feel extremely lucky when a hare crosses my path, sometimes they stop and look at me and then I feel sort of connected and earthed out. Beautiful Creatures.

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  • 3 weeks later...

For me hares are symbolic of cunning and craft. Possibly due to old accounts and stories of witches shape-shifting into hares. I was given a hare necklace that I adore.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hares mean a lot to me. Living out in the open with no den, exposed to all weathers, they seem an ultimate symbol of the freedom of nature. I love the hare in art, it seems the most mystical of creatures. I did eat one once, a long long time ago, it was very good, but I felt uncomfortable even then. I wouldn't eat one now any more than I would eat a dog.

 

Finvarra

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  • 1 month later...

For everything you ever wanted to know about Hares and their mythology try George Ewart Evan's " The Leaping Hare"

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  • 2 weeks later...

Interesting. My immediate reaction (for no particularly good reason) was to wonder whether the three hares are a naturalistic version of a triskele or a triquetra.

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A few years ago I was putting out on display in our shop a variety of small cast bronze hares. I was particularly taken with the dynamic features of the small statues. The very next day , when driving to the shop a hare ran across the road right in front of the van. It was a one off experience for me. I stopped the van and look looked to my right, straight into the eyes of the hair from a distance of no more than 10 feet. Such an intense stair and then dash! - he or she was gone through the hedge.

 

One or two weeks later I recounted the magical episode to a man who was delivering a display cabinet to the shop. It turned out he was a Druid. He later became my Druid teacher. I think the episode enabled me to connect with the man from whom I have learnt so much so thank you to the hare involved and the universal spirit of the hare asworked through this one.

 

ED

Edited by Earthdragon
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  • 1 month later...

Radio 4 serialised Lewis-Stempels's book 'the Running Hare' this week, read by the lovely Bernard Hill. It,s repeated tomorrow (Sunday 8th May) on 4 Extra or you can catch it on Listen Againor I player. Basically a farmer leases a field for year and sows wheat with wild flowers, no chemicals, to,see what wildlife will come to his field. Beautiful descriptions of the countryside and animals, and the effects of us on nature. Going to seek out the book now.

 

Finvarra

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Radio 4 serialised Lewis-Stempels's book 'the Running Hare' this week, read by the lovely Bernard Hill. It,s repeated tomorrow (Sunday 8th May) on 4 Extra or you can catch it on Listen Againor I player. Basically a farmer leases a field for year and sows wheat with wild flowers, no chemicals, to,see what wildlife will come to his field. Beautiful descriptions of the countryside and animals, and the effects of us on nature. Going to seek out the book now.

 

Finvarra

 

There was an article about this in our local newspaper - brought joy to my heart!

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I've been told that hares can really gaze at the full moon for a significant time, and because of that at one point people believed that hares can pass messages from the moon-goddess to people and vice versa. It doesn't surprise me to hear they're connected to love - deities, after all they are known for their fertility and spring madness :) in my country easter bunny is actually called a 'hare' and as such is a very important symbol for springtime festivities. Hare is one of the animals that I've found in my meditation during my pre-initiation training. It is also believed to bring good luck, particularly to witches (as in watching over us). And is a symbol of a certain line of BTW witches.

To sum it up, hares are important to me in a way and I don't think I'd eat one even given a chance. Not for spiritual reasons but just because I don't like meat in general ;)

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We seem to have a profusion of hares in Norfolk - I see at least a couple a day when out and about .... need to be watchful down the back lanes as they run out of nowhere under the car wheels. They are mostly solitary creatures and you seldom see two together unless mating and boxing in the Spring. They are indifferent mothers too - the leveret is kicked out of the nest whilst still very young, to fend for itself! Still, as there are so many of them hereabouts, they must be able to do that!

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  • 3 weeks later...

My pet name was and still is (actual name)-Bunny. I started feeling this totem a few years ago and maybe I share some characteristics somehow since I never asked to be called Bunny :P . I'm definitely more of a bunny in day to day life but feel the hare if in a 'magic mood'. Hares mean so much more than fertility.. magic, moongazing have all been mentioned. I know it's silly but I thought it was just popularist speak that rabbits/hares stare at the moon but after a trip to Northumbria to see an anglo saxon settlement at 1 in the morning (fun times!) I saw two rabbits staring at the almost full moon. Northumbria is rabbit heaven.. or at least one of them and we saw a hare near a burial mound too. Maybe a guardian? Who knows. All I know is they are wise, free and full of life (you have to be to box away any competition).

Edited by Heiðr Freyjasdottir
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  • 9 months later...

Hares are wonderful, rabbits have wreaked havoc in my garden to the extent that we grow no flowers (except the few they will not eat) and have only shrubs and trees - they even gnaw the bark of the apple trees ... I detest rabbits :huh:

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