Jump to content
Galaemar Laerareon

Welcome Guest!

Welcome to UK Pagan; The Valley

Like most online communities we require you to register for an account before we give you access to read and post.

Only a small number of our forum areas can be read without registering for an account.

The Magick Shop
Please consider visiting our kind sponsor: The Magick Shop
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Briton

The Lay Of The Seasons

Recommended Posts

Guest Briton

So, here it is, the finished product. Let me know what you think. The premise is that in my mythology, the Sun and the Moon are constantly fighting over dominion of the Earth, with little consideration over the interests of the Earth. Although the Sun is more powerful, it is further away, much further away. It is generally the "good" one of the two, the Moon being more a bitter antagonist, but they frequently cancel each other out so that neither kill life on Earth (the Moon's dominion is night and winter, the Sun's is day and summer). They exist in a balance that tips back and forth, like true ecology, not in perfect continuous harmony, but back and forth in influence, much like animal populations of predators and prey. They always have their kingdoms, night and day, but they are constantly fighting and chasing one another, hence the ebb and flow of the seasons. Meanwhile, Earth must bear the brunt of these changes, and continuously cope with the demise of each season, every year.

 

This is it, The Lay of The Seasons.

 

Pay close attention! Winter is giving birth,

she has betrayed her lover, the old cuckold moon.

The mistress of the dark, bitter cold nights has bore,

she brings forth a daughter, now warmer days loom.

The child's name is Spring, sired by the Sun,

she is a portent, that new life here comes.

Spring brings the hope of bounty ahead,

trees burst their buds, the bumblebee hums.

Looking to plot, unable to think clearly,

the moon, in its anger, begins to retreat.

He curses the Sun, swearing bloody vengeance,

Spring is still young, resting at winter's teat.

As spring matures, she summons the fawns and the haw.

The boar piglets bound, the hazels emerge.

In coming of age, she continues the cycle,

winter has passed, the Earth sings its dirge.

 

Winter knew me well,

deeper than any other.

Her frost pierced me,

my face, my soul,

my subterranean catacombs,

but she never loved me.

She only took, she killed, she diminished,

I am torn, I have never felt such intimacy.

Why was it her, of all of them?

I hate her, for what she has done to me,

but I love her, I miss her so, I pine for her.

Winter knew me well,

deeper than any other.

 

Watch closely! Spring was in labour!

She lay with the Sun, and brought forth a child,

This daughter, called Summer, brings with her heat.

Her kinship to the Sun spells the end to days just mild.

Spring raises her well, she is innocent and bright,

She is all that is good, and the Sun is so very fond.

He lavishes the Earth with all he can muster,

Summer matures all life, from the hilltops to the ponds.

The moon is little seen, seeking his chance,

“Needs must” he mutters under his breath,

In the short time he reigns during those days,

He takes what he wants, he says “it's this or death.”

The virginal season, knew not what went on,

The purity of summer taken in fading twilight.

The old woman of Spring grew fragile and frail,

Earth sung its lament when she died in the night.

 

Spring had sprung,

She came with new light!

Never have I known a woman,

To bring such delight.

To this land, she gave life.

She seemed to grow fast

Grow old and weary,

It must have been hard work,

to do what she did.

Salt of earth, a wholesome woman was Spring.

Spring had sprung,

And let's never forget.

 

Behold all the land! Autumn is ere!

She is sweet with the fruits of Summer's trials!

Apples, pears, berries and grain

This is the harvest, in sheaves, boxes and piles.

The trees are retiring in reds, yellows and browns,

This bittersweet girl, she'll perish and make,

The daughter of Summer, but not of the Sun,

Whose shame's absolute and whose daughter Moon takes.

The Sun curses the Moon for wreaking such havoc,

The season he loved most was defiled by his chill.

Invested in her the Moon started an end,

Autumn marked the fall, yet the dust was not settled still.

Summer grows weak as the Sun becomes shy,

It became a recluse, unable to love 'er.

The moon started its reign, with long cooler nights.

Hear the requiem of the Earth, now that Summer is over.

 

What has Moon done?

What treachery! What violence!

Summer lays to rest,

with the best days behind her.

Long balmy evenings enjoyed by all,

except for the Moon,

who anticipates his return.

Autumn does what she can

to salvage summer's labour,

but it's only a matter of time,

Before the frost ends the days of plenty.

See what Moon has done.

What treachery. What violence.

 

Pay heed, feasting people! Autumn has bore Moon a girl.

The Moon pounced at the chance, now that Sun is at bay.

The girl is called Winter, she is cold, cruel and heartless.

Winter took after Moon, and so she intends to stay.

She seems more powerful than Sun, swallowing most of the hours,

She sends trees back to their roots and animals to sleep.

They are awaiting the end, or the start of next year.

Lest they freeze, or they starve, many dig deep.

Some stay awake, like the deer or the fox,

Eking an existence from what little remains.

There's little to be had, so stay close to their dens,

They can sometimes be seen if you walk far off the lanes.

What the Moon doesn't learn is that Winter is selfish,

She cared not for him, and the Sun knew this well.

She lay with the Sun, and the new Year was certain.

Meanwhile Autumn faded, you could hear the Earth's knell.

 

You went not in vain, fair, unfortunate Autumn,

for the Moon's traits were to be its undoing.

The Moon cared not for the Sun,

and so Winter cared not for the Moon.

You provided the land with bounty,

The horn of plenty,

it sat at tables of rich and poor alike.

Fruit, meat, herbs and corn,

we owe a great debt to what you achieved.

In the end, the Sun came back to restore me,

So you went not in vain, fair, unfortunate Autumn.

Edited by Briton
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ad from Google

Jasmin

Love that !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hephaestus

Cracking stuff! I particularly like the way you've handled/explained the transitions between the seasons. The flicking between narrative and monologue also works really well I think.

Edited by Hephaestus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowWalker

Fantasic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Amanda George

Brilliant!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Briton

Thank you everyone. Not that I don't appreciate your kind words, but if you also give any constructive feedback and criticism that you can, if any comes to you. I always want to improve.

 

Thanks Hephaestus, I'm glad you enjoyed the style and allegory. The premise, the Sun and the Moon warring, plays a major role in the mythology, and will feature in my future epic poem/story-in-verse as the protagonist is told the cosmogony.

Edited by Briton
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

It's interesting that you characterised the seasons as female and sun and moon both as male, more typically I think of the moon as female. I liked the different take on it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hephaestus

It's interesting that you characterised the seasons as female and sun and moon both as male, more typically I think of the moon as female. I liked the different take on it :)

 

Characterisation of the moon as female also seems to be the way in most mythologies, although Norse mythology is notable for bucking the trend- with a male moon (Máni) and a female sun (Sól) (intriguingly John Lindow suggests that this may have had something to do with the grammatical gender of the nouns- Sól being feminine and Máni masculine). But in Britain I think we've been particularly conditioned by writers from the Romantic movement and beyond to see the moon as female- possibly due to the influence of classical mythology and/or the fact that the moon made a good metaphor for a female lover. Since I've been reading Norse mythology though, I've come to see the logic of a 'male' moon, and indeed a 'female' sun.

 

I'd agree that Briton's mythology is interesting in this regard, since he combines a traditional interpretation of a female Earth (which we mainly get from the Greeks, I think) with a different interpretation of both heavenly bodies as male. Within the logic of the mythology, it works really well, since Sun and Moon become (for want of better terminology!) 'impregnating agents' for the earthly, female figures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Briton

I'll be honest, I can't figure out whether the Earth itself should be male, female, or generally genderless. It's not so much the Earth that is female here, but the seasons. I see why, in this mythology, the Earth could be anything. In normal sexual reproduction (ie not seahorses!) the male fertilizes and observes remotely, whilst the female carries out the result intimately. In this mythology, the Sun and moon create the seasons to favour them, but it is not the earth that is carrying the season, but the last season. On this basis, the seasons mature and, like in real life, one gradually takes on the responsibilities of is predecessor. If it were the Earth that were pregnant by Moon and Sun, then the narrative would lack that slow from one to the other. That fact that the seasons are daughters of the last allow there to be a continuous cycling flow. The Sun and Moon realize the seasons of the land, and it would be easy to think that it was the greater presence of the Sun that created warm long days of life and birth, and the moon creates long, cold nights, without having to explain to a child that actually the Earth tilts. I don't want this mythology to be a gimmick. By that, I mean I know full well that the seasons occur because the Earth tilts, and I don't claim any antiquity that even inspired this mythology. Rather, it's an adventure in story telling. Personally, I believe most mythology was story telling, serving a purpose to explain things within a context that is quick and easy to understand. I think a lot of mythology was brewed up by elders on child, dark, boring nights, but largely explaining, but partly for entertainment. I don't think ancient people genuinely believed every single story they were told. Not because faith is 'stupid', because even children today question things you tell them, most of the time, if they see the stories as unbelievable.

 

So, rather than genuinely seeing the Sun and Moon as actually male, or the seasons as actually female, I see them as having masculine and feminine qualities respectively, which works for sorry telling/mythology purposes, but are only figurative. In the end I believe the Moon is just a ball of rock and has no gender or sex. I just think it works to apply these qualities for this purpose.

 

Sorry is this all seems obvious, I can't always tell if people are just viewing as I do or genuinely believe the celestial bodies have (spiritual) gender.

Edited by Briton
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

Personally, I believe most mythology was story telling, serving a purpose to explain things within a context that is quick and easy to understand. I think a lot of mythology was brewed up by elders on child, dark, boring nights, but largely explaining, but partly for entertainment. I don't think ancient people genuinely believed every single story they were told. Not because faith is 'stupid', because even children today question things you tell them, most of the time, if they see the stories as unbelievable.

 

 

I agree.. Like rudyard Kipling's 'just so stories'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Veggie dancer

Also in Lithuania the moon is 'male' (the God of the moon is menuo)

And the sun is 'female' (the goddess of the sun is saule)

 

Paganism is quite big there apparently, I heard they were converted to Christianity quite late and quite a bit of the mythology survives.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×