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fizzyclare1

Is There Any Heathen God's That...

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fizzyclare1

Like or are associated with the seasons?

 

Just curious really and in need of a bit of convo

 

Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk

 

 

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Moonhunter

Not my area. I've found this but cannot vouch for its' accuracy.

 

http://www.wizardrea...e/holidays.html

 

Muddled with wicca-lite modern pagan made up stuff. Best to ignore it, I'm afraid. Here's one on the ancient festivals:

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Blót

 

And this one on modern festivals actually observed by Heathens (though not all Heathens observe all of these, and many of us just observe one or two):

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Ásatrú_holidays

 

Of those attested in pre-Christian times, the Disting was associated with female ancestors and family luck/protectors, Alfblot with the elves and wights, Mothers' Night with The Mothers (possibly), and a couple of mid-winter festivals - one to Thor and one to Frey. But these weren't universal across all Heathen countries - for example, Mothers' Night is (IIRC) exclusive to England and may reflect the influence of the Romans here. The Frey one is Swedish and the Thor one Icelandic. The only ones common (AFAIK) to heathens in the UK are Winters Night, Mothers' Night and Yule.

 

Aside from that, according to Bede, our month of March (spring equinox) was dedicated to the unknown goddess Hređa. while our month April was dedicated to Eostre.

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Gliblet

Baldr is often portrayed as a Spring God, probably largely because of his death/rebirth story, and his being portrayed as the White/Fair/Shining One.

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Moonhunter

Baldr is often portrayed as a Spring God, probably largely because of his death/rebirth story, and his being portrayed as the White/Fair/Shining One.

 

But there's no actual foundation for that, is there? I can't recall anything in the Eddas that would support it - but my memory's far from perfect. :)

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Gliblet
But there's no actual foundation for that, is there? I can't recall anything in the Eddas that would support it - but my memory's far from perfect. :)

 

No, but then there's nothing in an awful lot of religious texts that actually links deities with the things they end up representing ;)

 

I think most of the inferred connection actually comes from Voluspa rather than Edda, the discussion of Baldr's rebirth. Personally I've always suspected the spring association has been 'misquoted' from Edda LIII where his horse is described as having the power to create springs wherever her hooves fell and Baldr therefore being considered the protector of springs and wells. Mythology by Chinese whisper, if you will.

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Moonhunter
But there's no actual foundation for that, is there? I can't recall anything in the Eddas that would support it - but my memory's far from perfect. :)

 

No, but then there's nothing in an awful lot of religious texts that actually links deities with the things they end up representing ;)

 

Absolutely! :)

 

I think most of the inferred connection actually comes from Voluspa rather than Edda, the discussion of Baldr's rebirth. Personally I've always suspected the spring association has been 'misquoted' from Edda LIII where his horse is described as having the power to create springs wherever her hooves fell and Baldr therefore being considered the protector of springs and wells. Mythology by Chinese whisper, if you will.

 

I have to admit to confusion. Isn't the Voluspa in the Poetic Edda? Or are you referring to something else? Which part of the Voluspa or either Edda is "Edda LIII"? The only bit in the Voluspa I know that refers to Baldr's resurrection is:

62. Then fields unsowed | bear ripened fruit,

All ills grow better, | and Baldr comes back;

Baldr and Hoth dwell | in Hropt's battle-hall,

And the mighty gods: | would you know yet more?

 

 

The only mention of horses I can think of in connection with Baldr is the Second Merseburg Charm:

 

Phol and Wodan

rode into the woods,

There Balder's foal

sprained its foot.

 

The trouble there is that there's no mention of the said horse creating springs. :D Snorri doesn't even bother to give Baldr's horse a name. Oh - I see...it's related in "Teutonic Myth and Legend" by Donald A Mackenzie. He seems to rely heavily on Viktor Rydberg (spit), and Rydberg on Saxo (writing around the time of Snorri). I wonder if it's in Saxo or whether Rydberg made it up from scratch? Let me look...

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Moonhunter

Ah, got it. From this source, and it gives a very good idea of why so many of us spit when Rydberg is mentioned:

 

From Rydberg's standpoint, the Merseburg charm points to powerful sorcery coming out of Jotunheim being aimed at Baldur, and injuring his horse's foot.

 

In comparing Baldur to the saint Stephanus, Rydberg (op cit., p.56) says, "The Ballad of Steffan relates how Stephanus waters the horse he rides and four others by a "spring", while the stars still twinkle. This watering-ceremony is the ballad's actual subject. Baldur is the defender of springs and wells. Springs rise up under his horse's hooves and wells are called by his name."

 

Saxo, Book Three (Peter Fisher, tr.) tells us that "The victorious Balder, wishing to provide water as due refreshment for his thirsty soldiers, bored deep into the earth and discovered underground springs. From every direction the parched troops made for the gushing rills with parted lips. The site is confirmed by a permanent name..."

 

It is directly thereafter that it is mentioned that Baldur is so tormented by phantoms that he was unable to walk.

 

The Ballad of St. Steffan (Rydberg, op cit., p. 54) also says,

 

"Steffan rides to the well --

... He scoops out water with the ladle..."

 

-- just as Baldur bored into the earth to bring up water for his troops in Saxo.

 

Rydberg in Investigations into Germanic Mythology, Volume I, Chapter 92, says, "In the Danish popular traditions Baldur's horse had the ability to produce fountains by tramping on the ground, and Baldur's fountain in Seeland is said to have originated in this manner (cp. P. E. Muller on Saxo, Hist., 120)." He also says, same chapter, "I now return to the Merseburg formula: "Falr and Odin went to the wood, Then the foot was sprained of Balder's foal". With what here is said about Baldur's steed, we must compare what Saxo relates about Baldur himself: Adeo in adversam corporis valetudinem incidit, ut ni pedibus quidem, incedere posset (Book III). The misfortune which happened first to Baldur and then to Baldur's horse must be counted among the warnings which foreboded the death of the son of Odin."

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Freydis

Spit is about right.

 

However, I do agree that an awful lot of deities end up linked with things they originally had nothing to do with, and linking Baldr with spring is par for the course.

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Wolfwind

I think Loki is having fun with the summer weather.

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